New Municipal Broadband Feasibility Study Underway in Firestone, CO

The Board of Trustees for the city of Firestone, CO is evaluating the feasibility of a new municipal broadband service for this growing town of about 10,000 people that sits just 30 miles north of Denver. This according to a recent report in the Times-Call newspaper in Longmont, Colorado.  The feasibility study will compare Firestone’s existing telecommunications infrastructure with those in nearby communities such as Longmont and Boulder that already have municipal networks. It will also assess the potential for growth of the service in Firestone to a nearby 3,500-home community development project.

It would be travesty to build a 3,500 home development without having a plan for high quality Internet access. Even if CenturyLink or Comcast were to deploy fiber optics there, the community should ensure there are plans for conduit or an open network to allow multiple service providers to provide a real choice.

A 2005 Colorado state law barring municipalities from providing internet service to their citizens has been an obstacle for Longmont and Boulder in their pursuit of their own city-run broadband services.  Telecommunications companies in the Longmont area spent $200,000 on a campaign that helped defeat the referendum in 2009 and $400,000 more in 2011.  But citizens in Longmont successfully voted in the 2011 referendum to exempt their town from the law and build their own community broadband network. As we wrote in May, Longmont’s NextLight fiber-based municipal broadband service, which started just 2 years ago, is now among the fastest internet services in the United States.

In Boulder, 84% of citizens voted in a 2014 referendum to restore the local government’s rights to restore local telecommunications authority. The city now provides free municipal Wi-Fi throughout the downtown civic area and additional fiber-optic infrastructure servicing city facilities with plans for further expansion.

As the Longmont Times-Call wrote in December, Longmont’s struggles and eventual success in starting their own fiber-based municipal network helped to pave the way for Boulder.  The success of those efforts also provide favorable local precedents for Firestone officials and other local advocates to demonstrate how well fiber-based municipal networks can benefit a community. According to Firestone spokeswoman Kristi Ridder, the possibility of Firestone eventually getting its own municipal broadband service is still a ways off, with no ballot question planned yet on Colorado State Bill 152.  But she acknowledged that inquiries from residents have prompted town boards to discuss the possibility of a community broadband service over the past several years.

Community Broadband Media Roundup - August

While we think they buried the lede (talking about cord-cutting and entertainment options when what we really need in this country is a locally accountable choice), the New York Times editorial board came out in support of local authority for municipal networks, in a roundabout sort of way.

Preparing for Life After Cable by Editorial Board of the New York Times

Although Americans now have more choices than ever for how they watch TV, about seven in 10 American households can only get broadband Internet service from one or two providers, usually cable and phone companies.

In other words, the big telecom companies will still have plenty of leverage. Some analysts predict that as customers desert cable TV packages for Internet-based services, the telecom giants like Charter and AT&T will simply charge more for Internet access, wiping out some or all of the savings consumers had hoped for.

That’s why it is important that Congress and the Federal Communications Commission push for more choices in the broadband market. Among other things, they should override laws some states have passed that make it difficult or impossible for municipalities to invest in broadband networks. State and local officials could also help by streamlining rules that make it hard for newer businesses to string fiber-optic cable on utility poles or below ground in order to compete with established cable and phone companies.

Community Broadband By State

Colorado

Winter Park, Fraser will put broadband question to voters by Hank Shell, Sky Hi Daily News

Routt County broadband plan could be ready in less than three months by Teresa Ristow, Steamboat Today

Fort Collins, Loveland Will Have Broadband Vote On The 2015 Ballot by Jackie Fortier, KUNC

 

Minnesota

Rochester tentatively to begin looking at broadband service by Jeff Kiger, The Post Bulletin

Foundation funds broadband upgrades, study in Sherburne by Mitch LeClair, St. Cloud Times

 

Missouri

After six-year push, rural Missouri still waits for high-speed Internet by Jeff West, Missourian

While mostly in metropolitan areas, fiber is arriving slowly to rural areas: In 2013, Co-Mo Connect, a subsidiary of Co-Mo Electric Cooperative, began laying fiber-optic lines that will eventually offer 1-gigabit service to 15 small mid-Missouri cities.

Co-Mo Connect serves Tipton, which posted the second-fastest download speed of any Missouri city in July, according to Ookla.

“You hear people in town asking each other, ‘Do you have it yet? Do you have it yet?’” said Marna Williams, Tipton’s deputy city clerk.

 

North Carolina

Bald Head Islanders to vote on $10 million broadband bond by Adam Wagner, Star News Online

 

Virginia

City to examine new broadband Internet Options by Chris Teale, Alexandria Times

One issue that will likely present itself is the need to dig up city streets to install cables underground. But Wilson pointed to what he called a “dig once” policy adopted around the country as a way around it. With the city set for massive upgrades in its sewer system, he said that installing broadband service underground at the same time could prevent streets and pavements being under construction for too long.

 

General Broadband News

Want fiber Internet? That’ll be $383,500, ISP tells farm owner by Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica

Digital Inclusion Leadership Awards Encourage, Highlight City Broadband by Colin Wood, GovTech

FCC asks whether data caps and high prices hurt broadband access by Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica

“…the FCC yesterday passed a Notice of Inquiry that "seeks comment on whether to consider standards beyond speed when assessing broadband deployment, including latency and consistency of service," the commission said. "And it asks whether to consider factors beyond physical deployment, including pricing and data allowances, privacy, and broadband adoption."

Evaluating latency will help determine whether satellite Internet service should be considered broadband.

Sixth Circuit consolidates cases, sets new briefing schedule in appeals involving municipal broadband laws by Davis Wright Tremaine LLP, Lexology

This Week On Bullish: The Digital Divide by Alex Wilhelm, Tech Crunch

Kitsap County Asks Residents Where to Expand

The Kitsap Public Utility District (KPUD) is turning to residents to plot the course for expansion, reports the Central Kitsap Reporter. In order to find out where the greatest interest lies in municipal fiber connectivity, KPUD will be using the COS Service Zones survey system.

“Since this is a public network, we do not feel comfortable relying on anecdotal data to determine the next phase for broadband expansion,” said Bob Hunter, Kitsap PUD General Manager. “What’s most appealing with the COS Service Zones is that it enables us to let the gathering and push come from the citizens. We want to be sure the residents are driving this.”

We have reported on the KPUD, mostly as it related to other stories. The publicly owned open access fiber network in Kitsap County Washington began providing wholesale only service in 2000. The goal was to provide better connectivity to public facilities and improve emergency communications and the KPUD has reached that goal.

Readers will remember Seth, who almost had to sell his Internet-less dream home due to mapping errors and the general failures at Comcast. When he approached the KPUD, they found a way to bring him an Internet connection. An increasing number of residents have asked the agency to find a way to serve their homes. Currently, PUDs in Washington are prohibited by state law from offering retail service, which can limit financially-viable investments, but Kitsap is trying to get a sense of the size of the interest.

The COS Service Zones system will help KPUD plan for any potential buildout by determining where customers are most likely to subscribe. The system will also allow the public to see where the KPUD plans to expand as a result of the survey.

Kitsap County residents can go to the website kpud.servicezones.net to fill out the online survey.

Rochester, Minnesota, City Council Reviews Municipal Fiber Proposal

Earlier this year, Rochester City Council members chose to look further at the prospect of developing a municipal fiber network. On August 17th, the Committee of the Whole met to hear a proposal from Alcaltel-Lucent to deploy 500 miles of fiber for approximately $42 million.

According to the Post Bulletin, the city recently surveyed 1,200 Rochester Public Utilities (RPU) customers and found that more than 75 percent of them supported the idea of Internet access from RPU.

Rochester residents and businesses have long suffered with expensive, unreliable, slow connectivity from incumbent Charter Communications. City Council member Michael Wojcik introduced the idea of publicly owned infrastructure in 2010 but the idea never picked up steam. He revived the issue last year when constituents began calling his office with complaints about Charter.

"Principally, I feel the technology, the customer service and price in Rochester are unacceptably bad (from Charter)," [Wojcik] said. "I get the feeling that a good portion of the public strongly agrees with that."

For this information session, the Council took no action; next, the proposal will be examined thoroughly by RPU officials.

Local video coverage from KTTC:

"Digital New England" Conference Set for September 27th, 28th in Portland

Over the past year, New England has been a hotspot for broadband initiatives, legislation, and experimentation. The trend will continue into September when Next Century Cities and the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) host Digital New England: A Summit for Regional Broadband Leaders on September 27th and 28th in Portland, Maine.

From a description of the event:

Broadband is emerging as a critical driver of economic growth and prosperity in New England. The “Digital New England” broadband summit will bring together state, local and federal officials, industry representatives, community leaders and other key stakeholders to share real-world broadband success stories and lessons learned from across the region. The summit will also examine the gaps that remain and strategize on what still needs to be done to expand access to and adoption of high-speed Internet services for the benefit of all citizens.

The event will start with a welcome reception on Sunday evening. Monday's day-long summit will include discussions on numerous topics that cover investment, access, and adoption. Come listen to some panel discussions and participate in some break-out workshops.

The welcome reception will be held at the Gulf Maine Research Institute at 350 Commercial St. in Portland. Monday's summit will be at the Holiday Inn by the Bay, 88 Spring St. in Portland.

Take a look at the schedule for this free event and register online at the Eventbrite page.

Ammon, ID Experimenting with Open Access FTTH Network

We have covered the small Idaho city of Ammon before, but the people there always seem to be innovating. A few weeks ago, the city took first place with an ultra-high speed app in a National Institute of Justice competition. That utlra-high speed came from the city’s fiber network built for municipal buildings several years ago. The network has since expanded to connect the schools and some businesses.

Now, residents of Ammon might also get to experience high speed Internet. The city is conducting a survey, called Get Fiber Now, to determine interest in building a unique open access network. The first area with a 70% take rate will have 300 homes added to the network.

Ammon's technology director Bruce Patterson has a plan to make this unlike any other open access networks in the world. The fiber will be partitioned to have multiple services (such as telephone and television) on one strand. Our Christopher Mitchell has called the idea "open access on steroids” and the "best shot at demonstrating what can be done as far as innovation on an open network.” Patterson now has a pilot project of about seven homes connected to the experimental network with symmetrical speed of 1Gbps.

The city intends to have the plans for the open access FTTH network finalized for this next spring and is looking at a 20- to 30- year bond to cover the costs.

Local news coverage has the rest:

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player

Policies for Better Broadband - Community Broadband Bits Podcast Episode 165

Back in July, Next Century Cities released a short report, Connecting 21st Century Communities: A Policy Agenda for Broadband Stakeholders, exploring various policies and approaches that will improve Internet access. The brief is organized into sections on local government, state government, federal government, philanthropy, and community.

For this week on Community Broadband Bits, Lisa Gonzalez takes the mic to interview Deb Socia, Executive Director of Next Century Cities, and me, the Policy Director for Next Century Cities (which I do within my capacity at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance).

We talk about the report, why we picked the policies we did, why we stuffed it full of examples, and as a bonus, Deb gives us an update of Next Century Cities and upcoming events.

We want your feedback and suggestions for the show - please e-mail us or leave a comment below.

This show is 20 minutes long and can be played below on this page or via iTunes or via the tool of your choice using this feed.

Listen to other episodes here or view all episodes in our index. You can can download this Mp3 file directly from here.

Thanks to bkfm-b-side for the music, licensed using Creative Commons. The song is "Raise Your Hands."

Santa Cruz Fiber Project with Cruzio

Santa Cruz, California, and its 62,000 people with poor Internet connectivity near Silicon Valley, could be one of the larger municipalities to develop a citywide fiber network. The Santa Cruz Fiber project, which was announced on June 24, 2015, would be an open-access public private partnership (PPP) with the city constructing the network and a private company, Cruzio, serving as network operator. The plans are preliminary, but the announcement highlighted the project’s emphasis on local ownership: 

“A locally-owned, next-generation broadband network operated openly and independently and built for Santa Cruz, [the Santa Cruz Fiber Project] is uniquely tailored to fit the diverse needs of the Santa Cruz community.” 

Cruzio is one of the oldest and largest Internet service providers in California. Completely locally-owned and staffed, Cruzio is rooted in Santa Cruz County. The company’s name perfectly describes it. Cruz- from Santa Cruz and -io from I/O (Input/Output, communication between an information processing system and the rest of the world).  Our Christopher Mitchell is gushing over the name and says: “I seriously love it.”

Fiber is not a new commodity in Santa Cruz. Since 2011, Cruzio has installed fiber in several of its projects, and the fiber has wooed some 30 entrepreneurs and solo practitioners to stay in the downtown area at the Cruzio Works, a co-working space. Last November, Central Coast Broadband Consortium commissioned a study of the fiber networks in Santa Cruz (paid for with a grant from the California Public Utilities commission). They discovered more fiber under the city of Santa Cruz than in any other city in the counties of Santa Cruz, Monterey, and San Benito. Unfortunately much of it belonged to incumbent providers like Comcast and AT&T who are loath to lease dark fiber or make affordable fiber connections available to local businesses and residents. 

Then, just this past June, Comcast announced the planned rollout of Gigabit Pro near Silicon Valley, but not Santa Cruz. Even if Comcast changes its mind, the city has already found a local private partner in Cruzio. This local public-private partnership will almost certainly result in far more benefits to the community than Comcast’s Gigabit Pro. This network will be under local control and responsive to community needs.  

The intention of the partnership is to pursue an open access model. At first, the network will be solely a public-private partnership where the City of Santa Cruz will own the network and Cruzio will construct and operate it. During the initial stages, Cruzio will provide the expertise in network management that the city of Santa Cruz does not necessarily have. After a number of years, the network will open up to more service providers in order to promote competition, which is how Westminster has arranged its partnership with Ting in Maryland. 

The goal of the FTTH project proposal according to Cruzio is to connect 6,000 households and businesses by the end of the third year. Currently, the construction costs are estimated at $52 million. The City staff will present a report to city council by the end of this September on the potential Fiber Project’s feasibility. Early project estimates suggest the network would be mostly completed by late 2018. If the take-rate is feasible, the city intends to back the network with municipal revenue bonds. Revenue bonds are repaid through the sale of networking services, not through taxes. This ensures that those who use the network will pay for the network. Cruzio is now surveying residents to determine interest and creating an engineering report. 

CLIC to Host Partnership Event at Broadband Communities' September Conference

Is your community considering a public private partnership to improve connectivity for businesses and residents? Will you be attending the Broadband Communities Economic Development Conference in Lexington this September? If you answered 'yes' to those two questions, you should attend CLIC's half-day event on Friday, September 18th.

Spend the morning breakfasting with telecommunication attorney Jim Baller and Joanne Hovis from CLIC along with Maura Corbett, CEO of Glen Echo Group and Heather Gold, CEO of FTTH Council Americas.

The rest of the agenda from a CLIC email invitation:

An Extensive CLIC Paper on the Key Business and Legal Issues in Public-Private Partnerships :

Moderator: Jim Baller - President, CLIC

Speakers:

The Private Sector’s Perspective :

Speakers:

  • Elliot Noss - CEO, Ting Fiber Internet
  • Bob Nichols - President, Declaration Networks Group
  • Levi Dinkla – Vice President & Chief Operating Officer, iTV-3
  • Steve Biggerstaff – Founding President, Director & Advisor, Metronet
  • Nicholas Hann – Senior Managing Director, Macquarie Capital/Macquarie Group Ltd.

The Public Sector’s Perspective :

Moderator: Catharine Rice - Project Director, CLIC

Speakers:

  • Robert Wack - President, City Council, Westminster, MD
  • Scott Shapiro - Senior Advisor, The Mayor’s Office, City of Lexington, Kentucky
  • Jon Gant – Director, UC2B

We Remember Scott DeGarmo

We were saddened to learn of Scott DeGarmo's passing this past week and, like many others who knew him and his work, want to pay tribute to his many contributions.

Scott was the CEO of Broadband Communities, a valuable resource that policy makers, industry chiefs, and community leaders depend on for the most recent developments in the world of advanced communications networks. Scott molded the magazine into a leading publication for readers and began the practice of bringing them together at an annual conference. He took it to a higher level by raising awareness, building coalitions, and creating possibilities.

Scott will be missed by many who care about connecting the world. You can share memories from others who knew Scott at the Broadband Communities Tribute Page. Thank you, Scott. Below is a tribute that Jim Baller has shared via the Coalition for Local Internet Choice.

Scott DeGarmo, CEO of Broadband Communities, passed away this weekend.  He was an ardent and invaluable supporter of CLIC and a champion of local choice.  He published and promoted CLIC’s articles on the Broadband Communities website and made sure that CLIC had a prominent role in Broadband Communities events, including the upcoming conference in Lexington.  We will send out more information on the Lexington conference later in the day, but first, we wanted to share a tribute to Scott from CLIC’s president, Jim Baller. 

A TRIBUTE TO SCOTT DEGARMO 

On Saturday, August 15, 2015, Scott DeGarmo died of pancreatic cancer at his home in Riverdale, NY, after exchanging goodbyes with his wife and daughters.  Scott was a giant in our field and a dear friend for many years. 

When Scott acquired Broadband Properties a little more than a decade ago, its activities consisted primarily of publishing a trade magazine for owners and managers of multi-tenant properties and holding an annual conference for them.  Over the years, under Scott’s visionary leadership, Broadband Properties expanded its services in the multi-tenant market and it increasingly focused its attention on the needs of cities, towns, and other localities across America for advanced communications capabilities and services.  Broadband Properties ultimately became Broadband Communities, and its magazine, primers, and other publications became must-reading for community leaders, industry executives, policy makers, and others stakeholders in America’s broadband Internet future.  Broadband Communities also hosted increasingly well-attended national and regional conferences featuring the latest and most important developments in fiber-based communications, presented by key federal, state, and local officials and a broad range of experienced practitioners.  Scott repeatedly insisted that speakers talk in plain language and provide as many real-world examples as possible, so that each attendee could take home valuable information that he or she could use immediately. 

If these had been Scott’s only accomplishments, they alone would have entitled Scott to our deep gratitude and praise.  But Scott’s contributions ran so much deeper.  In particular, in establishing the policies and high standards for Broadband Communities publications and events, Scott also played a major role in shaping and accelerating America’s deployment, adoption, and use of fiber-based broadband access to the Internet.  That is, Scott did not just disseminate information about important developments; he also had much to do with stimulating and influencing many of these developments. 

More specifically, Scott and his excellent team at Broadband Communities typically targeted the most important issues of the day and brought together the best minds to address them, with Broadband Communities readers and event attendees sharing the experience.  Among the many critical issues that Broadband Communities explored this way were how to develop a national broadband strategy, how to use advanced communications capabilities to drive and support economic development, how to stimulate broadband deployment and use in rural and other high cost areas, how to make federal stimulus-funded projects economically sustainable, how to preserve and protect local Internet choice, and how to foster public-private collaboration and partnerships.  In his quiet, understated way, Scott left an important mark on all of these issues and many more.   As Harry Truman observed, “It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.”

But what about the man himself?  As word of Scott’s passing has gotten around, tributes have poured into Broadband Communities from all directions, from individuals and entities of all kinds.  Again and again, Scott’s many colleagues and friends have stressed his intelligence and creativity, his unbounded positive energy, his kindness and grace, his generosity, his unassuming modesty, and his deep commitment to making fiber-based access to the Internet the platform and driver of simultaneous progress in just about everything that matters to America’s communities. 

In sum, in his professional life, Scott had an extraordinary significant impact in making our corner of the world a better place.  On a personal level, he left us a wealth of warm and wonderful memories.  In fact, looking back over the last decade, it’s hard to think of many individuals who contributed more. 

Scott has now left us physically, but his legacy will live on.  In recent weeks, recognizing that his time was short, Scott repeatedly asked those of us in his leadership circle to do everything possible to ensure that Broadband Communities will continue to grow and thrive.  In particular, Scott wanted us to have a great conference in Lexington, Kentucky, from September 15-18, 2015, in part to demonstrate that Broadband Communities can remain successful without him at the helm.  Please join us there if you can.   In particular, I urge CLIC members to check out our outstanding program on the morning ofSeptember 18. 

Photo of Scott courtesy of Broadband Communities.