Tag: "california"

Posted September 25, 2009 by christopher

San Francisco has leveraged its municipally-owned fiber in a program to overcome the digital divide. Projects like this are a good early step for larger communities. First, invest in fiber to public buildings, schools, etc., to cut costs from leased lines (often, while upgrading capacity). Second, begin to leverage that fiber to increase affordable broadband availability in the community. Expand until community needs are met.

Posted July 7, 2009 by christopher

In 2004, the Loma Linda city council passed a short, one paragraph ordinance that modified the building code. From then on, new buildings, or buildings that were significantly renovated had to meet specifications to be added to the Loma Linda community fiber network - the Connected Community Program. This is an interview with James Hettrick, who was largely responsible for it.

I'd like t hose communities to have an opportunity to say what kind of infrastructure is put in, so that they have some say over what kind of services they can provide later. It's pretty tough for cities to re-negotiate with the telcos after they put in their infrastructure and system. The telcos then see them as a revenue source rather than as a partner. After that, it becomes very difficult for cities to do the kinds of things that they may want to do.

Loma Linda is an interesting network because they have put it in the building code - meaning developers pay much of the cost of building it - a strategy that works better in towns with more greenfields than existing developments.

It's built by the developers to our specifications just like the streets, water, sewer and storm drains system. After completion, they deed the infrastructure over to us; we then must maintain it forever. Once it's available to us, we put in our active gear and serve their buyers. They, of course, market their homes in this region as unique. On a side note, studies have shown that homes wired with fiber usually sell for $4000-$14,000 over those without fiber [the additional cost of building the network is estimated at $3,500 per unit to the developer].

Posted June 1, 2009 by christopher

Community broadband networks offer some the highest capacity connections at the lowest costs. Many of these communities, before building their networks, were dependent on 1.5 Mbps connections that cost hundreds of dollars, or less reliable DSL and cable networks.

The community broadband networks below are full FTTH networks, so the advertised speeds are the experienced speeds -- unlike typical cable advertised speeds, which users pay for but rarely experience due to congestion on the shared connection.

In comparing some of the fastest publicly owned broadband networks to some of the fastest national private sector networks, we found that the publicly owned networks offer more value per dollar. Update: A few weeks after this was published, Verizon upped its speeds and prices for several of the tiers.

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The data we used is below. We thought about comparing also Qwest's "Fiber-Optic Fast" speeds, but their fastest upload speeds are below 1 Mbps, which makes them too pokey for the above networks.


Community Broadband Networks: The Best of the Best

Note: Speeds are expressed as Mbps Down/Up. Each network has distinct offering for each tier.

...
Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3 Tier 4
City State Speed Price Speed Price Speed Price Speed Price Notes
Lafayette Louisiana 10/10 $28.95 30/30 $44.95 50/50 $57.95 - - All connections come with 100Mbps connections to others on the local network.
Wilson North Carolina 10/10
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