Tag: "fact sheet"

Posted March 11, 2013 by christopher

We are pleased to announce our most recent Fact Sheet - Broadband 101! Most of the people following our work already know these key details but you also know people who are confused and perhaps intimidated by Internet issues.

Enter, the Broadband 101 Fact Sheet [pdf]!

We cover basic terminology, traditional technologies to deliver broadband, and common policy goals. We also explain why fiber optic connections are so popular lately and why neither we nor Wall Street expects robust competition in telecommunications.

This publication joins our previous fact sheets that explained how community owned networks have led to new jobs and tremendous savings for community anchor institutions.

Please share it with elected officials, local policymakers, friends, enemies, and those people you aren't sure you really know on Facebook. If you have some thoughts on what we missed or what should be included in Broadband 201, let us know in the comments below.

Posted January 19, 2013 by ejames

Even as the Internet is changing every aspect of our lives and communities, most Americans are intimidated by confusing jargon and misconceptions about Internet policy. We are developing a series of fact sheets that make these issues understandable to everyone.

We presently have fact sheets, covering broadband, financing networks, wireless Internet, economic development benefits from community owned networks, and the public savings from community owned networks.

If you want to stay up to date with these fact sheets and other developments in community owned networks, subscribe to our one-email-per-week list. Once a week, we send out an update with new stories and resources.

Broadband is Affordable Infrastructure

Local governments spend billions on all sorts of infrastructure every year to advance the public good for their communities. Roads and bridges keep day-to-day activity moving. Investments such as water and sewer infrastructure keep cities clean and livable. Fiber infrastructure is used for a wide range of purposes, including economic development, education, and to keep a city’s administration connected. To get a look at how fiber network infrastructure compares to other public investments, we've developed the Broadband is Affordable Infrastructure fact sheet.

Broadband is Affordable Infrastructure.

Creative Funding Sources For Fiber Infrastructure

As interest in publicly owned broadband network infrastructure increases, local communities seek new ways to fund municipal networks. Revenue bonds, interdepartmental loans, and avoided...

Read more
Posted November 29, 2012 by lgonzalez

We have already published a fact sheet on the critical role community broadband plays in job development. Now, ILSR presents a collection of how commnity owned broadband networks save money for local government, schools, and libraries while providing cutting edge services. The Public Savings Fact Sheet is now available.

Though schools, libraries, and other community anchors need access to faster, more reliable networks, the big cable and telephone companies have priced those services so high that they are breaking the budget. But when communities create their own connections, affordable high capacity connections are only one of the benefits. A community owned network offers the promise of self-determination -- of upgrades on the community's time table and increased reliability for emergency responders.

The Public Savings Fact Sheet is a great piece to share to mobilize other members of your community. Share it with decision makers and use it to start meaningful conversations. Distribute it widely and often.

We are always developing new resources. If you have an idea for a new fact sheet, we want to hear it.

Posted November 7, 2012 by christopher

Community Broadband Networks have a very good track record in creating jobs, and we have just released a fact sheet [pdf] that collects some exciting success stories -- where a publicly owned network attracted new businesses or helped existing businesses to thrive.

Though the telecommunications needs of local businesses have swelled dramatically in recent years, the DSL and cable networks have not been able to keep up. Businesses are often stuck between a connection that does not meet their needs and a connection they cannot afford -- but local, publicly owned networks have stepped in to provide the ultra-fast, super reliable services at affordable prices.

This fact sheet discusses the jobs that were enabled by public investments in Chanute, Kansas; Chattanooga and Tullahoma, Tennessee; Lafayette, Louisiana; Bristol, Martinsville, and Danville, Virginia; and Springfield, Missouri.

This should be a great resource for those educating their community about the importance of having a network that is directly accountable to the community. Hand it out, include it in conference materials, email it to legislators, whatever.

We are developing additional fact sheets, but are always interested in what would be most helpful to you, so don't be afraid to tell us.

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