Tag: "transcript"

Posted February 17, 2017 by htrostle

 

Duffy Newman: The reason the carriers are using this type of technology is because they're trying to improve coverage but they're also looking at capacity.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 239 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. Last week, we talked to Lincoln, Nebraska, a community using its fiber and conduit resources to improve wireless service in the city, using small cell technology. In this episode, Christopher gets the perspective of an infrastructure company that works on small cell deployment with wireless carriers. Duffy Newman is the acquisitions manager and corporate development in strategy for Crown Castle. Chris and Duffy touch on the function of Crown Castle and Duffy offers more detail on how small cells work and the difference between the new small cell technology and the traditional mobile wireless systems.

Christopher Mitchell: Hey folks, this is Chris Mitchell, the most of Community Broadband Bits. I just wanted to ask you if you could do us a real big favor to help us spread this show around. That's to jump on iTunes or Stitcher, wherever you found this show, and to give us a rating. Give us a little review, particularly if you like it. If you don't like it so much, then maybe don't do that, but if you're enjoying the show, please give us a rating and help us to build the audience a bit. Thanks.

Lisa Gonzalez: Now, here's Christopher talking with Duffy Newman, acquisitions manager and corporate development and strategy for Crown Castle.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. Today, I'm speaking with Duffy Newman, the acquisitions manager and corporate development and strategy at Crown Castle. Welcome to the show, Duffy.

Duffy Newman: Thanks, Chris.

Christopher Mitchell: I'm very glad to have you on. This show is following one week after we've just talked a little bit about what Lincoln is doing with small cells. I'm excited that our audience has some sense of how one city's dealing with it but now, I think we're going to talk a little bit more about what small cells are and offer people a better explanation. I think the best place to start would be with what Crown Castle does. Can you tell... Read more

Posted February 17, 2017 by htrostle

David Young: This infrastructure is coming and you should be prepared for it.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is Episode 238 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. David Young, Right of Way Manager for the City of Lincoln, Nebraska, has been on the show before to tell us about the city's investment in its extensive conduit network and fiber resources. This week David's back to talk to Christopher about a new project that involves improving mobile wireless service throughout the city with small cell technology. Lincoln has recently entered into an agreement with a private provider and, thanks to the resources that are already there, taking the next step to better service in Lincoln is a win-win for the entire community. David and Christopher go through the details and discuss how small cell technology is something local governments can be ready for.

Christopher Mitchell: Hey, folks. This is Chris Mitchell, the host of Community Broadband Bits. I just wanted to ask you if you could do us a real big favor to help us spread the show around and that's to jump on iTunes or Stitcher, wherever you found this show, and to give us a rating, give us a little review. Particularly if you like it. If you don't like it so much, then maybe don't do that. If you're enjoying the show, please give us a rating and help us to build the audience a bit. Thanks.

Lisa Gonzalez: Now here's Christopher talking with David Young, Right of Way Manager for the City of Lincoln, Nebraska.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. Today I'm back with David Young, the Fiber Infrastructure and Right of Way Manager for the City of Lincoln, the Public Works Department. Welcome back to the show.

David Young: Good morning, Chris. Thanks for having me back.

Christopher Mitchell: Yes. I'm very excited to have you back. I've always enjoyed our conversations, especially the off-the-record ones. I'm hoping that for people who maybe are turning in on their first show, you can just give us a quick, quick reminder of what Lincoln is like. I think a lot of people might think of it as just being cornfields.

David Young: There is a lot of corn in Nebraska.... Read more

Posted January 31, 2017 by htrostle

This is the transcript for episode 237 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. Joining the show from Washington state's Kitsap Public Utility District are General Manager Bob Hunter and Superintendent of Telecom Paul Avis. Listen to this episode here.

Bob Hunter: There's just not high enough densities in the rural area to make it cost benefit as a business model from a private side.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 237 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. This week, Christopher is joined by Bob Hunter, General Manager of the Kitsap Public Utility district in the state of Washington, and also the organization's Superintendent of Telecom, Paul Avis. Bob, Paul, and Christopher discuss how the KPUD is responding to requests from local residents and businesses, and starting to offer connectivity over its open access network. They discuss the financing used to bring the infrastructure to people in areas where national companies can't justify more investment. In Kitsap, it's becoming another utility supplied by the KPUD.

Chris Mitchell: Hey folks, this is Chris Mitchell, the host of Community Broadband Bits, and I just wanted to ask you if you could do us a real big favor, to help us spread this show around. That's to jump on iTunes, or Stitcher, wherever you found this show, and give us a rating, give us a little review. Particularly if you like it. If you don't like it so much, then maybe don't do that, but if you're enjoying the show, please give us a rating and help us to build the audience a bit. Thanks.

Lisa Gonzalez: Now, here's Christopher talking with Bob Hunter, General Manager, and Paul Avis, Superintendent of Telecom, from the Kitsap Public Utility District in the state of Washington.

Chris Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, and today I'm speaking with two really funny fellows from Kitsap Public Utility District. Let me start by introducing Bob Hunter, the general manager of the Kitsap Public Utility District in Washington state. Welcome to the show.

Bob Hunter: Thank you.

... Read more
Posted January 23, 2017 by htrostle

This is the transcript for episode 236 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. Rebecca Agner, Will Aycock, and Kelly Vick hail from Wilson, North Carolina. They discuss Wilson's Internet access program for public housing. Listen to this episode here.

Will Aycock: Our top priorities are supporting the economic health of the community and enhancing the quality of life of our citizens and helping them to build a better life.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 236 of The Community Broadband Bits Podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. We've spoken with Will Aycock, manager of Wilson, North Carolina's Green Light Community Broadband Network in the past, to learn about how the community developed its fiber-to-the-home network. This week Will is back again, joined by Rebecca Agner, communications and marketing for the city of Wilson, and Kelly Vick, president and CEO of the Wilson Housing Authority. Recently the network began working with the local housing authority to provide low cost high quality Internet access to residents of the city's public housing. Will, Kelly and Rebecca delve into how the partnership came about and what it means for people who are on a limited budget and living in the connected facilities. The group also touches on how Greenlight is contributing to efforts to revitalize the community, especially the downtown areas. Now here's Christopher, talking with Will Aycock, manager of Greenlight, Rebecca Agner, communications and marketing for the city of Wilson, and Kelly Vick, president and CEO of the Wilson Housing Authority.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of The Community Broadband Bits Podcast. This is Chris Mitchell, with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. Today I'm talking to three folks. We're going to try and get a little crazy here with three different voices coming in, talking about what Wilson, North Carolina is doing to bring some great connectivity to low income housing. I'm going to start off by introducing Will Aycock, a veteran of our show, manager at the Greenlight Community Broadband, the municipal utility. Thank you Will for coming back on the show.

Will Aycock: Thank you Chris for having me again.

... Read more

Posted January 13, 2017 by htrostle

This is the transcript for episode 235 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. Lee Brown and John Williams from Erwin, Tennessee, join Christopher Mitchell to talk about the incremental build out of a Fiber-to-the-Home network. Listen to this episode here.

Lee Brown: The great thing about municipal broadband is it allows each community to decide what's right for them. We're in the greatest place of all time is being able to make that decision to do what's right for your community.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 235, of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast from the Institute from Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. We wanted to interview folks from Erwin, Tennessee for some time, now, and this week we're lucky to have them. The community, population around 6,000, has been building out a Fiber-to-the-Home system incrementally for the past few years. In addition to improving connectivity for residents and local businesses, the network has improved operations for the municipality's other utilities. Today, Christopher talks with Lee Brown, general manager of Erwin Utilities, and John Williams, fiber engineer. Lee and John, describe how the community had carefully considered what was best for them, before pursuing a fiber network. As it turns out they had considered fiber for a while before the circumstances were right to deploy. They started with a pilot program, and the network continues to grow. John and Lee offer Erwin's rational for the incremental approach, and share the way the network has improved services for all utility customers. Not only those that take Internet access services. Now, here's Christopher talking with Lee Brown, general manager, and John Williams, fiber engineer from Erwin Utilities in Erwin, Tennessee.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell, and today I'm speaking with two gentlemen from Erwin, Tennessee. We'll start with Lee Brown, the general manager of Erwin Utilities. Welcome to the show.

Lee Brown: Thanks, Chris. We appreciate being able to be part of this, today.

Christopher Mitchell: We also have with us, John Williams a fiber-optic engineer for Erwin Utilities. Welcome to the show.

... Read more

Posted January 4, 2017 by htrostle

This is the transcript for episode 234 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. The MuniNetworks crew (Christopher Mitchell, Lisa Gonzalez, Nick Stumo-Langer, and Hannah Trostle) recap some of the events of 2016 and then predict what will happen in 2017. The first two predictions are from two of our listeners, Jeff Hoel and Rebecca Toews. Listen to this episode here.

Rebecca Toews: I predict that I will still be on hold with Comcast.

Hannah Trostle (reading Jeff Hoel's prediction): I predict that that the EPA will try and put itself and the FCC on the endangered species list.

Nick Stumo-Langer: You just don't know how many illegal things they talk about on this podcast anyway because Lisa cuts them out.

Christopher Mitchell: That's a great way to start the show. Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. This is our year in review and next year in anticipation episode, I guess. Here with me we've got Lisa.

Lisa Gonzalez: Hey there.

Christopher Mitchell: And we've got Hannah.

Hannah Trostle: Hi.

Christopher Mitchell: And we've got Nick back again.

Nick Stumo-Langer: Hi Chris, good to be here.

Christopher Mitchell: You were here last, one year ago I believe when Lisa was in Michigan and we needed someone to feel in.

Nick Stumo-Langer: Yup, you've retained my seat. It's been great.

Christopher Mitchell: Yeah we haven't moved the seat since then. I think it makes sense to look back at some of the predictions we made last year. Rebecca, who I don't know if we've ever formally announced that Rebecca had moved on to another organization. We miss her on a daily basis, but she was on the show last year in which we talked about our predictions and whatnot. Do we want to review any of our predictions?

Lisa Gonzalez: I think we could look at a few of them. Why don't we do that? Let's see. We talked a little bit -

Christopher Mitchell: Before we got too far into this I just wanted to make a quick plea, please don't forget us in your year end giving. LSR, the Institute... Read more

Posted December 22, 2016 by htrostle

This is the transcript for episode 233 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  rit Fontenot and Anthony Cochenour of Bozeman, Montana, explain how Bozeman Fiber is a nonprofit, open access, community network. They go into detail about the funding behind the project. Listen to this episode here.

 

Anthony Cochenour: There were a number of trusting moments along the way and I'm happy to say that since then we've been able to meet and exceed all the expectations that have been set, and so I think that definitely gives us a good leg up for the future.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 233 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. We followed Bozeman, Montana's fiber-optic network initiative for the past few years, now, as it developed from vision to reality. The open access network is already serving local government facilities, and public schools, and businesses are also being connected. In this interview, Christopher talks with the city's economic development director, Brit Fontenot, and Anthony Cochenour, president of Bozeman Fiber, the nonprofit entity created to manage and operate the network. Christopher, Brit and Anthony share an update on what has been happening with the network since our last interview, that was during episode 142, back in March of 2015. The guys talk about the nonprofit open access model, and the city's current role. They also discuss how the community obtained funding for the project and what it was like rallying local banks to contribute to the project. Now, here's Chris with Brit Fontenot, the city's economic development director and Anthony Cochenour, president of Bozeman Fiber.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell. Today, I'm speaking with two folks from Bozeman, Montana, catching up on a network that we previously discussed. First of all, we have Brit Fontenot, who is the city of Bozeman's economic development director. Welcome back to the show.

Brit Fontenot: Thanks, Chris. It's a pleasure. Thanks, a lot.

Christopher Mitchell: We are also welcoming back Anthony Cochenour, the president of Hoplite Industries, and now the president... Read more

Posted December 14, 2016 by htrostle

This is the transcript for episode 232 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, General Manager Josh Byrnes of Osage Municipal Utilities joins the show to share how fiber connectivity has benefited the Iowa community. Listen to this episode here.

Josh Byrnes: Everything is live about it, you can lock in your commodity prices, all your inputs and all those things can be done. We've got to have connectivity, in rural Iowa.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 232 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute For Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. In Osage, Iowa, the community's electric utility has served the town and some of the rural areas around it for about 125 years. Osage Municipal Utilities also offers natural gas services and invested in its own communication system in the early 2000s. They offer telephone, cable TV and Internet connectivity via their cable network. Clearly Osage is one of those rural communities that think about the future. In this interview Christopher speaks with Josh Byrnes, the general manager of Osage municipal utilities, who discusses their long term plans to bring Fiber-to-the-Home to the community. Josh who is also a former state representative spends some time discussing Iowa's approach to rural connectivity and its investment in the Iowa communications network. Now here's Chris talking with Josh Byrnes, general manager of the Osage municipal utilities and a former member of the Iowa House of Representatives.

Chris Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell and today I'm speaking with Josh Byrnes, the general manager of Osage Municipal Utilities in Iowa. Welcome to the show.

Josh Byrnes: Thanks for having me Chris.

Chris Mitchell: I'm excited to talk to you, as I was saying in our pre-interview I actually have this memory and I'm excited to be reminded of the story that you'll be telling us in a few minutes about these cattle prices and an app, around how it's important to have Internet access out on farms near your community. Let's start with a little bit of background for people who aren't familiar with Osage. Where are you in Iowa? What's the community like?

Josh Byrnes:... Read more

Posted December 9, 2016 by htrostle

This is the transcript for episode 231 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. Mark Farrell of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors explains a proposed ordinance to improve Internet access for residents of apartment buildings. Listen to this episode here.

Mark Farrell: The MDU access policy is truly part of a broader scope here in San Francisco of work around Internet connectivity and Internet access.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 231 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast from the Institute For Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. Residents of apartment building or other types of multi-dwelling units don't always have their choice of Internet service provider, even if they're two or three companies competing in their neighborhood. Owners of the buildings they live in have been known to restrict access to the buildings to one provider. As a result, tenants who want Internet access have no practical choice at all. In episode 231, Mark Farrell joins Christopher. Mark is from the San Francisco Board of Supervisors and has introduced legislation that would create an ordinance to allow competing ISPs access to multi-dwelling units. Mark explains the ordinance and why the city needs to implement it. He also describes how this policy is only one part of the city's greater effort to improve connectivity for all its residents. Now here's Chris talking with Mark Farrell, supervisor from the San Francisco Board of Supervisors about a new proposal to remove restrictions of subscriber choice for people who live in multi-dwelling units.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell. Today I'm speaking with Supervisor Mark Farrell of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Welcome to the show.

Mark Farrell: Thanks for having me.

Christopher Mitchell: I think I'd like to jump right in and just ask, you're proposing a law that deals with condo and apartment buildings. What would your law fix?

Mark Farrell: Right now in San Francisco we have a huge number of multi-dwelling unit buildings, or MDUs as they are called, where tenants have not been able to get access to the Internet service providers... Read more

Posted December 2, 2016 by htrostle

 

This is the transcript for episode 230 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. Harold DePriest of Chattanooga, Tennessee, describes his role in building the fiber network in the city. This is an in-depth interview of over an hour in length. Listen to this episode here.

Harold DePriest: This fiber system will help our community have the kind of jobs that will let our children and grand children stay here and work if they want to. That is the biggest thing that has happened.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 230 of the community broadband bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. Chattanooga, Tennessee has been profiled in dozens of media outlets. It's a community reborn from one of the dirtiest cities in America, to what is now an economic development powerhouse. The city's publicly owned fiber optic network provides high quality connectivity that attracts businesses and entrepreneurs, but getting to where they are today did not happen overnight. In this episode, Chris has an in depth conversation with Harold DePriest, one of the men behind bringing fiber optics to Chattanooga. He's retired now, but as president and CEO of the electric power board, he was involved from the beginning. Harold describes how the electric power board made changes both inside and out, and went from being just another electric utility, to one that's considered one of the best in customer service in the country. The interview is longer than our typical podcast, but we think it's worth is. Now here are Chris and Harold DePriest, former CEO and president of the electric power board in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to a community broadband bits discussion. A long form discussion, a little bit different from what we normally do, with someone that I have a tremendous amount of respect for, Harold DePriest. Welcome to the show.

Harold DePriest: Thank you. It's good to be with you Chris.

Christopher Mitchell: Harold, you've been the CEO, and you've recently retired from being the CEO and president of the electric power board in Chattanooga, which runs that legendary municipal fiber network. You've been involved in many capacities in public power, and I know that you're... Read more

Pages

Subscribe to transcript