Tag: "transcript"

Posted January 13, 2020 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 388 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, the Community Broadband Networks team reviews their predictions from 2019 and makes new predictions for 2020. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Christopher Mitchell: Hi everyone. Welcome to another episode of community broadband bits. It's nice to be back in the office.

Katie Kienbaum: Chris, I think you mean community brooooadband bits

Christopher Mitchell: podcast.

Katie Kienbaum: I think they got that from, you know, the fact that we're in their ears right now.

Christopher Mitchell: I really wonder about the sound quality. I'm pretty sure that you went to 11.

Katie Kienbaum: I could try it again.

Christopher Mitchell: Hey everyone, that's Katie. I'm Chris. We have the largest community broadband bits podcast ever today. I think for our special year end and new year prediction show. Michelle was leaning forward to introduce herself.

Michelle Andrew: Hi, I am Michelle.

Christopher Mitchell: Michelle does our broadband mapping in data type stuff. Katie does a lot of research, she may have seen her working on rural issues and open access and whatever else I feel like assigning to her in any given time. Then we have our two people who've been on the show a little bit more often.

Jess Del Fiacco: This is Jess del fiacco, the communication specialist with the community broadband team here.

Lisa Gonzalez: And this is Lisa, the one who has to edit this thing, who is going to wring Katie's neck.

Katie Kienbaum: Like I said, I can do it again if you need me to.

Christopher Mitchell: Maybe from the hallway. And we're at the Institute for local self reliance where we are talking about things that, well I guess we're going to reflect over the past year and talk about what we might be looking out for in the coming year in 2020, the coming decade perhaps, who knows? I think we should turn to Lisa to ask her where we should start.

Lisa Gonzalez: Well usually what we start with...

Read more
Posted January 3, 2020 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 389 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher speaks with Mayor Gary Fuller from Opelika, Alabama, about the city's decision to privatize its broadband network in order to serve more people. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Gary Fuller: At&t has a very big stick and some of these areas in North Auburn that we wanted to serve, they didn't particularly want to serve them, but they didn't want Opelika to serve them either and we were willing and able to do that.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 389 of the community broadband bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. The last time Mayor Gary Fuller from Opelika, Alabama was on the podcast was 2013. He came on to talk about his city's exciting new designation as the state's first gigabit community. A lot has happened since then. They deployed to the entire city and sought to expand to nearby Auburn but Alabama state restrictions prevented them from serving the city just a few miles away. After multiple attempts to change the state law, all flooded by dozens of lobbyists from incumbent At&t, community leaders and Opelika realized that the best option was to privatized the network, which they did in 2018. Mayor Fuller is back on the show this week and though you don't hear them in the interview, he's accompanied by Derek Lee, director of Opelika power services and Joey Motley, city administrator, the Mayor who spearheaded the project and led the community shares the Opelika story. He describes why the town decided they needed to bring some Internet access, competition to town, the challenges they faced, and the details behind the sale. For more on Opelika story go back to podcast episode 40 from April of 2013 and check out our coverage at muninetworks.org. Now here's Christopher talking with mayor Gary Fuller from Opelika, Alabama.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the community broadband bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance up in a rather chilly Minneapolis this morning and I'm speaking with Mayor Fuller from Opelika, Alabama. Welcome back to the show, Mayor Fuller.

Gary Fuller: Hey, great...

Read more
Posted December 21, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for the third episode of our special Community Broadband Bits series, Why NC Broadband Matters. In this episdoe, Christopher speaks with his interviewees about how inaccurate mapping affects broadband funding and planning in North Carolina and how we can fix it. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Brian Rathbone: And so I think we've made progress, we'll continue to make progress, but right now the fact that there's federal dollars are being spent without sufficient understanding of the true on-the-ground service, I think is indicator enough that we need to continue to concentrate on this.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to a special episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast and our new podcast series, Why NC Broadband Matters. I'm Lisa Gonzalez with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in Minneapolis, Minnesota. NC Broadband Matters is a North Carolina nonprofit. Their mission is to attract support and champion the universal availability of affordable, reliable, high capacity Internet access, which is necessary for thriving local communities, local businesses, and a local workforce to enable them to compete in the global economy. The group has created the North Carolina chapter of CLIC, the Coalition for Local Internet Choice. We are collaborating with NC Broadband Matters to present this series that touches on issues that while certainly affect folks in North Carolina also impact people in other states. Our third episode is titled Broadband Mapping Means Money: Understanding how Data Drives Decisions. You've heard from us and from other organizations about the problem with mapping data. Most grants and loans established to connect unserved and underserved communities are based on FCC data that overstates coverage. Today's guests are working to change that. First, Christopher speaks with Brian Rathbone, cofounder of Broadband Catalysts. They get deeper into the problem as it relates to topology and federal mapping. Then Christopher talks with Jeff Sural from the North Carolina Department of Information Technology where the state is working to improve the data they use to determine where folks need better Internet access. Now here's Christopher with Brian and Jeff to talk about mapping.

...

Read more
Posted December 21, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 387 of the Community Broadband Bit's podcast. In this episode, Christopher interviews Doug Dawson of CCG Consulting, who shares his advice for communities interested in improving local connectivity. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Doug Dawson: It's no longer should we do it, it's how do we do it and that's a giant change.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 387 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. Many listeners already know Doug Dawson from CCG Consulting. He's been on the podcast before often meeting up with Christopher at events to sit down and discuss current happenings. Both are attending the broadband communities economic development event in Alexandria, Virginia when Christopher decided he wanted to hear some advice for communities from the man who has worked with so many of them over the years. Doug explains how many of his clients are no longer asking if they can improve broadband, but turned to him for advice on how to do it — they know it's critical. He talks about the feasibility study process and how a high level of communities that hire him for studies are following through and moving forward with his recommendations. Doug gets into some of the reasons why local communities are making broadband investments and explains why it isn't always a good choice for every community. Be sure to check out Doug's blog, POTsandPANsbyCCG.com. Now, here's Christopher talking with Doug Dawson from CCG Consulting with advice for communities.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits podcast, early morning live edition. I couldn't quite hit that intro the way I like to, but this is Chris Mitchell coming to you from Alexandria, Virginia, where we're at the broadband communities event. It's been a wonderful event, I'm talking about economic development and local governments for the most part. I'm here with Doug Dawson, a repeat guest, founder and owner of CCG Consulting. Welcome back!

Doug Dawson: Hi Chris!

Christopher Mitchell: It's been a fun event. We had a chance to talk a little bit yesterday and one of the things I...

Read more
Posted December 21, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 386 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher talks with folks from Medina County Fiber Network and Lit Communities about their partnership that's helping connect Ohio bussinesses and soon residents over an open access network. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Brian Snider: This is something that I think will continue to happen across the country with municipal broadband and private capital getting injected in.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 386 of the community broadband bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. We've interviewed guests on the podcast before that discuss different types of collaboration. This week we have three people who are here to talk about the new partnership in Ohio that centers around the Medina County Fiber Network. We've had one of them on the show before, David Corrado, CEO of the network and this time he's joined by Brian Snider and Ben Lewis-Ramirez from Lit Communities. In this conversation, we learn more about Lit Communities. David also provides a refresher on the Medina County Network's progress and why they decided it was time to bring services to residents. Christopher, David, Brian and Ben also talk about the partnership between the network and Lit communities and their new entity, Medina Fiber, and the plans they have to serve residents. We get to learn about how private capital is playing a part in this community-based project, more about the model and some of the innovative services that Medina Fiber will offer the local community. Now here's Christopher talking with David Corrado from the Medina County Fiber Network and with Brian Snider and Ben Lewis-Ramirez from Lit communities.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the community broadband bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in sunny, if chilly, Minneapolis. Today I'm speaking with a trio of folks that are doing a pretty exciting project together. I'm going to start by introducing Brian Snider, the CEO of Lit communities. Welcome to the show!

Brian Snider: Thanks, Chris. Good to be here.

Christopher Mitchell: We...

Read more
Posted December 17, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

 

This is the transcript for episode 385 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher talkes to Brandon Makaawaawa and Matt Rantanen about connectivity in indigenous communities and deploying a community network in Pu‘uhonua o Waimānalo. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Brandon Makaawaawa: Internet is very vital to our community and not having that access is a weakness that is now going to be fulfilled with this summit.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 385 of the community broadband bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. While the community broadband networks team has been fighting the cold and snow in Minnesota, Christopher recently spent a week in Hawaii. He wasn't on vacation though, he was attending the Internet society's Indigenous Connectivity Summit 2019. While he was there, he interviewed Brandon Makaawaawa, a local broadband champion, and Matt Rantanen from the Southern California Tribal Chairmen's Association. Regular podcast listeners will recognize Matt who's been on the show in the past to talk about advances and tribal networks and how local tribal communities are making better connectivity happen for themselves. During this conversation, you'll get to hear the purpose of the summit and how the annual event has evolved. You'll also get to hear about how Brandon's indigenous community has found themselves in a situation where high speed connectivity from the big providers isn't headed their way. We learn a little about his people's history, which has contributed to their current situation and their decision to pursue self-determination. We get to hear about one of the purposes of the summit, a deployment of a community broadband network in Brandon's village. Even though the environment is far away from many of the rural communities that we usually report on, we learned that many of the roadblocks are the same. Now here's Christopher talking with Brandon Makaawaawa and Matt Rantanen at the 2019 Indigenous Connectivity Summit in Hawaii.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the community broadband bits podcast, Hawaiian edition. It's Chris Mitchell from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance....

Read more
Posted December 5, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 384 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher speaks with Matt Larson, owner and CEO of wireless ISP Vistabeam, about his company, the CAF II auction, and rural Internet access. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Matt Larson: These ranchers had actually put the lines up themselves. They had bought the equipment and the wire to put the lines up themselves. So what's really interesting I think is the fact that we're building the service out here and working with these property owners, these ranchers. I think that is interesting deal to be able to show that there's this ability for people in these areas to figure out their own solution.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 384 of the community broadband bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self Reliance . I'm Lisa Gonzalez. You've likely heard the term space cowboy and probably urban cowboy, but this week Christopher talks with Matt Larson, a "wireless cowboy". Matt is owner and CEO of Vistabeam. During this interview, you'll learn that the nickname doesn't come from the garb he wears, but from wrangling Internet access for people in some of the most rural areas in the American West. Vistabeam was awarded subsidies in the connect America funding part two auction and is working to extend their fixed wireless service to more rural communities. Matt who grew up on a ranch knows what it's like to struggle without high quality connectivity and he's made it his life's mission to change that for others living in extremely low population density areas. Matt and Chris talk about the CAF II Auction, the bidding process, and the challenges that Vistabeam has faced as a small company participating in the process. They talk about the new lifeline product that will provide much more affordable and reliable connectivity than the satellite Internet access many locals depend on in the very rural areas. Matt discusses the people they typically serve and why he's not worried that the space X project or places companies services anytime soon. Now, here's Christopher talking with Matt Larson from Vistabeam.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the community broadband bits podcast. I'm Chris...

Read more
Posted November 22, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 383 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher interviews Craig Eccher from Tri-County Rural Electric Cooperative in Pennsylvania about the co-op's new Fiber-to-the-Home build. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Craig Eccher: The whole project itself has made the rural electric co-op relevant again to its membership.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 383 of the Community Boadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. While Christopher was at the Broadband Communities economic development forum in Alexandria, Virginia, last October he interviewed several people for the podcast, including this week's guest, Craig Eccher from the Tri-County Rural Electric Cooperative in Pennsylvania. Craig and Christopher discussed the cooperative's fiber optic project that will bring high quality Internet access to the rural areas within their seven county service area. Located in the north central region of the state and in the Appalachians, large Internet access providers have been hesitant to deploy there due to lack of population density and the challenges in a rugged geography. Craig talks about some of the reasons why the co-op chose to invest in the project, the main impetus being the wishes of cooperative members. He discusses the creative approach they took to find out members' wishes. Christopher and Craig also touch on the co-op's partnerships with established municipal network Chattanooga EPB and with cable companies that serve in the area. There are benefits that go beyond connectivity, and as an electric guy, Craig is sure to point those out. Now here's Craig Eccher from Pennsylvania's Tri-County Rural Electric Cooperative.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. Another live edition — this one also from Alexandria, as we'e here at the Broadband Communities event, talking about economic development. I just pulled Craig Eccher, the president of Tri-County Electric in my home state of Pennsylvania. Welcome to the show.

Craig Eccher: Thanks Chris. Really enjoy being here.

Christopher Mitchell: You were just on a...

Read more
Posted November 14, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 382 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher speaks with Mel Poole from Ocala, Florida, about the growth and evolution of the city's fiber network. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Mel Poole: I think for a city our size to be on the leading edge of technology, I think, is fantastic, and I want us to to be the leader in that innovation, if you will.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 382 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. In October, Christopher attended the Broadband Communities economic development forum in the D.C. area where he had the opportunity to sit down and talk with today's podcast guest, Mel Poole from Ocala, Florida. Years ago, Ocala decided to eliminate leased T1 lines and replace them with city owned fiber. They found that the move has saved millions of dollars and opened doors. That was before Mel's time, but he knows the story and shares it with us, describing how Ocala went from municipal facilities to offering connectivity for county facilities and later to connecting schools, businesses, and residential subscribers. Mel also talks about some of the challenges they've faced, including how demographics affect demand, experimenting with deployment methods to find the best option, and how to make the best use of marketing. Christopher and Mel also talk about some of the economic development stories in Ocala and discuss Mel's vision for the community. Now, here's Christopher with Mel Poole from Ocala, Florida.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast, live edition. This is Chris Mitchell at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm in Alexandria, which I think is in Virginia — nobody flame me for that — at the Broadband Communities economic development event, and I'm talking with Mel Poole, the director of the Ocala fiber network.

Mel Poole: That is correct.

Christopher Mitchell: All right.

Mel Poole: Good morning. How are you?

Christopher Mitchell: The introduction was too long and I started to forget the title...

Read more
Posted November 14, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 2 of the Why NC Broadband Matters bonus series from the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher speaks with Gene Scott, general manager of outside plant for the Greenlight network in Wilson, North Carolina. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Gene Scott: And the door's going to be wide open. It's not going to be just that traditional, "We're going to offer TV and Internet and telephone services over these fiber optic networks." We haven't even imagined all the uses for it yet.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to a special episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast and our new podcast series, Why NC Broadband Matters. I'm Lisa Gonzalez with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in Minneapolis, Minnesota. NC Broadband Matters is a North Carolina nonprofit. Their mission is to attract, support, and champion the universal availability of affordable, reliable, high capacity Internet access, which is necessary for thriving local communities, local businesses, and a local workforce able to compete in the global economy. The group has created the North Carolina chapter of CLIC, the Coalition for Local Internet Choice. We're collaborating with NC Broadband Matters to present this series that touches on issues that while certainly affect folks in North Carolina also impact people in other states. Our second episode is titled Fiber Rich Wilson: Why and What's Next? You've heard plenty of podcasts from us about communities that have developed Fiber-to-the-Home networks. Have you ever wondered about the actual fiber? In this interview, Christopher talks with Gene Scott, general manager of outside plant from Wilson, North Carolina, where the community has been working with fiber for more than a decade. He talks about Wilson's network — past, present, and future. Now, here's Christopher and Gene to discuss fiber, Wilson, North Carolina, and the Greenlight community broadband network.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast — special series. This is episode two in the Why North Carolina Broadband Matters podcast series, done by me, Christopher Mitchell, at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. And today I'm...

Read more

Pages

Subscribe to transcript