Tag: "transcript"

Posted January 29, 2015 by Sorawit

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 86 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Bruce Patterson on the network in Ammon, Idaho. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:06:

Bruce Patterson:  We build the road.  And we let anybody that wants to use them use them.  So, the commercial enterprises on those roads might FedEx, UPS, or the U.S. Postal Service.  We are not those entities.  We are the entity that builds and maintains the roads.  So we're completely open.

00:23:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi, there.  You are again listening to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

In this episode, Chris connects with Bruce Patterson.  He's the Technology Director for the City of Ammon, Idaho.  Ammon began by building its network to connect a few municipal facilities.  City leaders realized they could save some money, and control internal connections, if they built the network themselves, rather than leasing from a private company.  The open access network now saves public dollars, provides needed connectivity, and even brings in some revenue.  Ammon was one of the many communities that applied for, but did not receive, federal stimulus dollars, under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act.  The story is compelling, because city leaders united together to pursue their vision and make it a reality.  Today, the network also serves businesses, schools, and libraries.  Ammon hopes to extend the network benefits even farther into the community.  Here are Chris and Bruce, discussing the network in Ammon, Idaho.

01:22:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today, I'm speaking with Bruce Patterson, the City of Ammon Technology Director -- out there in Idaho.  Welcome to the show.

01:35:

Bruce Patterson:  Thank you, Chris.  I appreciate you inviting me.

01:37:

Chris:  Absolutely.  I've been watching Ammon for a long time.  I think you're doing some very interesting things.  You're certainly blazing a trail in Idaho.  Some of the first in the state.  But let's start with a little bit of background, for people who aren't familiar with Ammon. ...

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Posted January 29, 2015 by Sorawit

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for proving the transcript for the episode 117 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with David Asp and Rosalee McCready on "Dig Once" policy that enriched fiber network in Dakota County. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:06:

David Asp:  There's got to be key people who have the knowledge base to be able to see to it that things get done.

00:12:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi, and welcome to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

David Asp, Network Collaboration Engineer for Dakota County, and Rosalee McCready, .Net Systems Analyst, join Chris this week to talk about the county's fiber optic network.  Serving schools, libraries, and a long list of public facilities, the network keeps operations coordinated, while saving public dollars.  One of the factors that helped community leaders expand the reach of the network is a long-standing "dig-once" policy, and the culture that has emanated from it.  Recognizing the savings, benefits, and value of "dig-once" to other entities working in Dakota County personnel developed any and all opportunities to collaborate.  Chris, David, and Rosalee discuss the inspiration for establishing the collaborative approach that led to the network's success.  For some communities, especially in rural areas, smart policies, like "dig-once," collaboration, and innovation are a must for a successful result.

01:16:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today I'm speaking with two folks from a little bit south of me, in the Dakota County Department of Information Technology.  I've got David Asp, a Network Collaboration Engineer.  Welcome to the show.

01:33:

David Asp:  Thank you.

01:34:

Chris:  And Rosalee McCready, .Net Systems Analyst.  Welcome to the show.

01:38:

Rosalee McCready:  Thank you.

01:39:

Chris:  Well, I'm very excited to have both of you on, because, frankly, there's a lot of talk about "dig-once" type approaches.  And I think some of it is aspirational, and a lot of it really hasn't been figured out, in many cases...

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Posted January 29, 2015 by Sorawit

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for the episode 55 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Chris and Lisa on "overbuilding" in Part Two of 'Crazy Talk'. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:20:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  This is the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  And I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

In a past episode, we listened to common arguments from telecommunication company lobbyists that Chris had recorded at an event in Wisconsin.  We chose three typical statements, and addressed them, one by one.  This week, we travel back a bit to June 2011 and Washington DC.  Chris participated in a debate sponsored by the Information Technology Innovation Foundation.  Rob Atkinson, President of the foundation, put forth several arguments.  We chose three of his arguments and examine them for part two of our "Crazy Talk" series.  We talk about the concept of "overbuilding,"  the claim that building in the U.S. is more challenging than in other parts of the world, and the misconception that subscribers demand nothing more than minimal speeds.  Even through Mr. Atkinson argued these points two years ago, they're the same sound bites lobbyists use today.  Let's jump right in.

01:17:

Rob Atkinson:  I just don't see any rationale for the federal government -- or state government -- funding overbuilders.  It just, to me, is a waste of societal resources when we have, according to the FCC -- what is it? -- around 8, 9 percent of homes, communities -- households that cannot get broadband.  There's a real reason they can't get broadband.  It's not that the providers are nefarious or selfish.  It's because it costs more to give them than you can get in revenues.

01:43:

Chris Mitchell:  Well, let me ask you, Lisa -- when we start off about this, let me ask you, when you hear the term "overbuilder," what does that mean to you?

01:51:

Lisa:  When I hear the term "overbuilder," I think of something that's unnecessary.  I think of something that is predatory.  Those are the first two words that come to mind for me.

02:05:

Chris:  So, this is something that industry often uses, right?  I mean, a lot of us think of having multiple...

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Posted January 26, 2015 by Sorawit

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for the episode 90 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Jory Wolf on the fiber approach in Santa Monica, California. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Jory Wolf:  We knew what it was like not to own this asset.  We knew what it was like to lease it from others.  And it became clear to us that this was something that we weren't going to bleed through the nose on.  We were actually going to own it.

00:24:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello there.  You are listening to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  And this is Lisa Gonzalez.

Today, Chris visits with Jory Wolf, Chief Information Officer for the City of Santa Monica.  We just released a report on City Net, Santa Monica's awesome fiber network.  The network now serves businesses of all sizes with dark and lit fiber, as well as government facilities, schools, and libraries.  And it even facilitates a free Wi-Fi network for the public.

Many communities that deploy their own fiber networks own municipal electric utilities.  This is a distinct advantage.  That's not the case in Santa Monica.  Santa Monica's path, an incremental build that required no debt, provides a possible option for other communities similarly situated.  Here are Jory and Chris.

01:11:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell, today speaking with Jory Wolf, CIO for the City of Santa Monica.  Welcome to the show.

01:21:

Jory Wolf:  Thank you, Christopher.

01:22:

Chris:  It's wonderful to have you on.  We've been talking for the past year or so, as we gathered research for the report we've just released, on Santa Monica City Net, a network run out of your Information Systems Department.  So, congratulations on such a wonderful network, and I'm glad we're able to bring some attention to it.

01:40:

Jory:  Thank you.  And thanks for showing the interest in our story.

01:44:

Chris:  Absolutely.  That's what we're going to talk about today.  And I'd like to start by just giving people a sense of what Santa Monica is like, for the...

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Posted January 26, 2015 by Sorawit

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript of the episode 88 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Chris Mitchell on the overview of Stockholm's Stokab. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Chris Mitchell:  But I think that if we look at this over many decades of time, if you're a city that figures out how to get a lot of fiber in the ground, and you make it available on reasonable terms, over a long period of time, you're going to be really better off.

00:24:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi, there.  Welcome again to the Community ....

00:26:

Chris:  Welcome to the -- hey, wait a minute.

00:28:

Lisa:  Oh, oh, oh, Chris.  Hi, Chris.

00:31:

Chris:  Good morning.

00:33:

Lisa:  You weren't here, so I thought I'd, you know, just sort of take over.

00:36:

Chris:  Yeah, that works.  You'd probably do a wonderful job.  I look forward to it.

00:40:

Lisa:  Um.  Hey, everybody.  We're back at the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  And this time we're doing something a little different.  We like to shake it up once in a while.  Chris just got back from a visit to Stockholm, Sweden.

00:52:

Chris:  I was at an event in Stockholm called "Fiber: the Key to Creating World-Class IT Regions," which followed the European Fiber-to-the-Home Council event, which is a yearly event.  It's actually incredibly large -- 6,000 people, and a very large convention center.  And it was very cool.  I spent two days getting a better sense of how Europe deals with fiber.  I had a lot of great conversations with people.  And then I finished it off by talking about fiber in North America and in the United States, and sort of what we got right, and what isn't working so well.  And did some Q&A.  And then I hopped on a long flight home.

01:31:

Lisa:  So, tell me how you found it.  Was it -- had you been there before?  Or was it the first time to Sweden?  Or -- tell me how the experience was, just for you personally.

01:39:

Chris:  Well, it was wonderful.  I mean, Stockholm was great.  It was a little warm for my taste -- right around freezing.  Whereas here, we were a lot colder than that.

01:47...

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Posted January 26, 2015 by Sorawit

Thanks to Joeff Hoel for providing the transcript for the Episode 85 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Jesse Harris on the UTOPIA network in Utah. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:06:

Jesse Harris:  And so we could end up in a situation where CenturyLink or Comcast say, hey, you know what, we've got some lawyers who've come up with a really good argument.  We're going to sue to shut down every inch of fiber that's outside of a member city.

00:18:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello there.  You are listening to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  And I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

People familiar with happenings on publicly-owned networks are probably already aware of the long drama in Utah with UTOPIA.  The publicly-owned network has faced years of adversity.  Utah is one of the states with barriers that make it extremely difficult for municipal networks to function.  The telecommunications lobbyists have been active in the state capitals across the country again this year.  Once again, legislation has been introduced that targets UTOPIA.  House Bill 60, if passed, will prevent UTOPIA from expanding, and can eventually contribute to its demise.

This week, Chris talks with Jesse Harris, writer and editor for the FreeUTOPIA blog, and then he speaks with Pete Ashdown, Founder and President of XMission.  Jesse and Pete each offer details on HB 60, what it may mean for the network, the providers that use UTOPIA, and for the local community.  We see bills like HB 60 introduced every year in some form or another.  They claim to encourage free enterprise and competition, but under closer examination, those bills do just the opposite.  They propagate the current telecommunications environment, in which a few large providers call the shots, in the field and at the legislature.  Here are Chris, Jesse, and Pete.

01:37:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell, and today I'm speaking with Jesse Harris, the founder of FreeUTOPIA, a website with a lot of information about the UTOPIA network.  Welcome to the show.

01:51:

Jesse Harris:  Thanks for having me.

01:52:

Chris:  You and I have...

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Posted January 26, 2015 by Sorawit

Thanks Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for the Episode 83 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Barry Lynn on the real threats from monopoly. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:09:

Barry Lynn:  It is only in the modern America of the last twenty years that we've seen such a radical degradation of these principles.

00:19:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  You are listening to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

This week, Chris interviews Barry Lynn, Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation.  Lynn has written extensively on political and economic results of concentration of power in the U.S.  He's presented his work to world leaders in the U.S., Europe, and Asia.  In this discussion, Lynn delves into how policy in the U.S. has evolved to favor the concentration of power.  Every industry has endured extreme consolidation, including telecommunications.  As more communities attempt to invest in publicly-owned networks, they often find themselves as targets of deep-pocketed and distant incumbent providers.  Chris and his guest discuss how the foundation of our system drives this destructive behavior, and how looking back may actually help us move forward.  Here are Chris and Barry Lynn.

01:11:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Christopher Mitchell.  Today, I'm talking with anti-monopoly expert Barry Lynn, Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation, and author of the book, "Cornered: The New Monopoly Capitalism and the Economics of Destruction."  Welcome to the show.

01:29:

Barry Lynn:  Thanks for having me on today.

01:31:

Chris:  Absolutely.  So you're an anti-trust, anti-monopoly expert.  I wanted to start by asking you, why is there a need for anti-monopoly law?

01:41:

Barry:  There's a need for anti-monopoly law mainly so that we can protect ourselves against the concentration of political power.  I mean, this is something that goes back to the beginning of this country.  It really goes back to the real tea party.  And it's the idea that, in order to protect our most basic liberties, we have to ensure that no one is...

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Posted January 26, 2015 by Sorawit

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for Episode 82 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Robert White on broadband in Russellville, Kentucky. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:09:

Robert White:  Anyone who knows me knows that I'm an advocate of the privates sector, that I love free enterprise.  However, in this case, if there was ever a test case that shows where the incumbents were not meeting the need, or even not being in the community, this was one.

00:28:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi there.  You're listening again to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

Russellville, Kentucky, recently earned the distinction of being the first gigabit community in the state.  Since 2005, the Russellville Electric Plant Board has offered some form of telecommunications in its service area.  In 2010, the community began developing a fiber network to spur economic growth, and to provide services the incumbents were not willing to offer.  This week, Chris visits with Robert White, General Manager and Superintendent of the Russellville EPB.  They discuss the situation that inspired community leaders to invest in a fiber network.  Russellville is another example of a self-reliant community that took the bull by the horns to bring better connectivity to its citizens.

01:13:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today, I'm with Robert White, the General Manager of Russellville Electric Plant Board.  Welcome to the show.

01:24:

Robert White:  Well, thank you.  It's a pleasure to be a part of.

01:27:

Chris:  Can you start by telling us where you are in Kentucky, and what the area around your community -- what your community is like?

01:34:

Robert:  Sure.  Sure.  We are located in Logan County, Kentucky, which would be sort a south-central part of Kentucky.  It's a beautiful community, very rural and agricultural.  Of course, we're located in the county seat, which is Russellville, Kentucky, in Logan County.  And we're pretty proud.  We're pretty close to Clarksville,...

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Posted January 26, 2015 by Sorawit

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for Episode 56 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Scott Hurlbert on fiber network in Shafter, California. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:16:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi again, and welcome to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

This week, we talk to Scott Hurlbert, Assistant City Manager of Shafter, California.  Several years ago, Shafter city leaders decided a municipal network was a must, to ensure future economic development.  The community was -- and still is -- transitioning from an agricultural economy to a more diverse mix of industry and manufacturing.  Like water and electricity, Shafter recognizes that broadband is critical infrastructure to promote growth.  Our regular listeners will note that Shafter is unique because it does not have an electric utility.  Nevertheless, this community is in the middle of an expansion, and has built its network incrementally, with no borrowing or bonding.  Here are Chris and Scott.

01:01:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another episode of Community Broadband Bits.  Today, I'm up in Minneapolis again, talking with my guest, who's in Shafter, California.  I'm speaking with Scott Hurlbert, the Assistant City Manager of Shafter.  Welcome to our show.

01:15:

Scott Hurlbert:  Well, thank you very much, Christopher.  It's a pleasure to be here today.

01:19:

Chris:  We're excited to learn a little bit more about your network.  I've long known that there was something happening in Shafter.  And I think a fair amount of our guests are always curious to learn about a city they haven't heard of before.  Maybe we could start with you telling us a little bit about what Shafter's like.

01:34:

Scott:  Sure.  That would be fine.  Shafter is what you would consider a small town -- 17,000 residents currently.  We're in California's Central Valley, just above the town of Bakersfield, which is the largest town near us.  And we're between highways.  So a lot of people, even in the Central Valley, aren't familiar with Shafter.  We're between the two north-south highways that run down California's Central Valley:...

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Posted January 24, 2015 by christopher

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for Episode 134 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Elliot Noss, CEO of Tucows and head of Ting. Listen to this episode here.

00:08:

Elliot Noss: You know, I think that fiber infrastructure is the most important economic asset that any town, city, or country could have. And, you know, I think that there's all kinds of ways -- and we haven't even started to scratch the surface -- of models where you can have municipal or government ownership in partnership with companies.

00:33:

Lisa Gonzalez: Hello. This is the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

Muninetworks.org readers know that Tucows, Inc., parent to mobile's cell service and Internet provider Ting, has recently announced it will begin offering Internet service in Charlottesville, Virginia, and Westminster, Maryland. If you've never heard of Ting, it's been praised for its excellent customer service. Yes, that's right, a communications company that actually provides a kind of service customers deserve. Tucows is acquiring fiber assets from an existing private entity in Charlottesville and partnering with the city of Westminster as it deploys its municipal fiber infrastructure. Tucows has announced that part of its strategy to expand as an ISP is to seek out communities that have publicly-owned fiber assets in place and deliver services via municipal fiber infrastructure. In this interview, Chris talks with Elliot Noss, CEO of Tucows, about this exciting model, and how they intend to apply it to gigabit connectivity. Partnerships between the public and private sector are one way to increase choice and improve services.

The Community Broadband Bits Podcast comes to you every week with no advertising. Unfortunately, they're not free to produce. Please consider contributing to our work by visiting ilsr.org and clicking on the orange "donate" button.

Now, here's Chris, speaking with Elliot Noss from Tucows.

02:00:

Chris Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell. Today, I'm speaking with Elliot Noss, the CEO of Tucows. Welcome to the show.

02:11:

Elliot Noss: Thanks, Chris. Thanks for having me.

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