Tag: "transcript"

Posted March 2, 2015 by

Thanks Jeff Hoel for proving the transcript for the episode 136 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Dan Dorman on non-metro Minnesota's need for high speed Internet connectivity. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:08:

Dan Dorman:  With some of my more conservative former members that say it's a private free market, I generally try to remind them, you know, if you're going to have a free market -- and you believe in the free market -- you have to have at least three competitors.  And in most places in Greater Minnesota, there's one.

00:23:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  This is the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

Our guests often include CIOs, municipal utility managers, or other people with extensive technical expertise.  Well, this week, Chris interviews a leader in economic development advocacy.  Dan Dorman is a business owner and Executive Director of the Greater Minnesota Partnership.  He's also served as a member of the state legislature.  Dan's unique perspective gives him insight into the needs of Minnesota businesses.  And at the top of that list is better connectivity.  Working as an elected official at the state level, Dan also saw the influence of big cable and telecom lobbyists.  Chris and Dan discuss the Greater Minnesota Partnership and the critical need for better connectivity in the parts of the state beyond the urban center.  They address the challenge that lawmakers face.  And Dan offers suggestions for improving connectivity, including creating an environment where municipalities are allowed to step in and serve local communities.

The Community Broadband Bits Podcast is a weekly advertisement-free service from ILSR.  Please consider contributing to our efforts.  Go to ilsr.org and click on the orange "donate" button.

Now, here are Chris and Dan Dorman, from the Greater Minnesota Partnership.

01:46:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  Today, I'm speaking with Dan Dorman, the Executive Director of the Greater Minnesota Partnership.  He's a small business owner, and a former representative...

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Posted February 26, 2015 by

Thanks Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for the episode 138 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Chris Lewis on Title II and network neutrality. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:09:

Chris Lewis:  The chairman is finding the sweet spot of having strong consumer protections under the strongest possible legal justification, which is under Title II.  But not going to any extremes by bringing up highly controversial issues, like unbundling or rate regulation.

00:27:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  This is the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has stated that reclassifying Internet service providers as common carriers under Title II is an idea that deserves serious consideration.  President Obama has already publicly stated that he believes new network neutrality rules should include this update.  The issue has been hotly debated lately, with network neutrality advocates often in support of the proposal, and large providers opposed to it.  Large providers are not the only ones who question the wisdom of the policy, for several reasons.  A small number of municipal networks have also expressed concern.

In order to address some of those concerns, Chris decided this week to talk with Chris Lewis, Vice President for Government Affairs for Public Knowledge.  Lewis has worked for the FCC, and has also spent some time working for the U.S. Senate.  He's able to fill in some of the information gaps related to this question of Title II and how it would be implemented.

We bring you the Community Broadband Bits Podcasts, with guests like Chris Lewis, each week, ad-free.  But we could certainly use your support.  We hope you'll consider contributing to our work.  Please go to ilsr.org and click on the orange "donate" button.  And remember, every little bit helps.

Now, here's Chris, interviewing Chris Lewis, from Public Knowledge, about Title II and network neutrality.

01:55:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today I'm speaking with Chris Lewis, the Vice President of Government Affairs for Public...

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Posted February 26, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for the episode 139 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Alex Deshuk on "dig once" policy and benefits from fiber leases in Mesa, Arizona. Listen to this episode here.


00:08:

Alex Deshuk: The iCloud is now over Mesa.

00:11:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  This is the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

As the community of Mesa, Arizona, began to grow, community leaders recognized that telecommunications would be a key element to its success.  This week, Chris visits with Alex Deshuk, Manager of Technology and Innovation for Mesa.  As you will hear, Mesa used several creative methods to ensure better connectivity.  The community was an early adopter of "dig once" policy, placing conduit whenever streets were excavated for any other infrastructure purpose.  Mesa has also taken advantage of non-traditional existing infrastructure, planting fiber in abandoned conduit that had been used for other utility purposes.  The result is a network of about 150 miles of fiber throughout the community.  The investment has paid off in a number of ways over time and helped the city establish a broadband-friendly environment for economic development.

We bring you the Community Broadband Bits podcast ad-free each week.  But we need your support.  It's easy.  Go to ilsr.org and click on the orange "donate" button.  You can also donate at muninetworks.org from the top menu bar.  Each contribution is appreciated.

Now here are Chris and Alex, discussing the ways Mesa has turned a long-term vision into reality in Arizona.

01:36:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  Today, I'm speaking with Alex Deshuk, the Manager of Technology and Innovation for the city of Mesa, Arizona.  Welcome to the show.

01:50:

Alex Deshuk:  Thank you, Chris.

01:51:

Chris:  So, can you tell us a little bit about Mesa?  I've been through Arizona a number of times.  And it's an incredible place.  But I had not actually been to Mesa, I don't believe.

02:00:

Alex:  We're kind...

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Posted February 5, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 108 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Don Ingle on the past and the future of muni fiber in Boulder, Colorado. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:15:

Don Ingle:  We literally wanted to take back the control the city had before 2005 and that, we believe, all cities in the state of Colorado should have to chart their own destiny.

00:26:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi there.  This is the Community Broadband Bits Podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

Community leaders in Boulder, Colorado, will be asking the voters this fall to restore local authority to provide municipal telecommunications.  Regular listeners to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast will remember our conversations with Colorado's Montrose and Longmont.  Both communities voted to reclaim that same right, which was stripped from local government in 2005.  Director of Information Technology for Boulder Don Ingle talks with about the city's strategies that have helped them establish a fiber network for government purposes.  The community has installed conduit and fiber for several decades, partnering with the university, federal laboratories, and local schools.  While the existing fiber assets could be an excellent foundation for future expansion, Don stresses that community leaders have not developed any specific plans.  The primary purpose of this initiative is to regain local control.

Here are Chris and Don.

01:26:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today I'm speaking with the Director of Information Technology for the City of Boulder in Colorado.  Don Ingle, welcome to the show.

01:38:

Don Ingle:  Thanks, Chris, very much for inviting me.

01:40:

Chris:  Absolutely.  We've been very interested in a lot of things that have been happening in the Boulder region, and so we're thrilled to see some of the recent news stories coming out of Boulder, and excited to learn a little bit more about things that have been going on for a while, in terms of how you've been meeting your -- the needs of the city and some of the major...

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Posted February 5, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 107 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Jeff Wilson on their muni fiber network in Holly Springs, North Carolina. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:15:

Jeff Wilson:  We quickly determined that to do our own network was going to be cheaper and more beneficial for the community.

00:22:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi there, and welcome to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  I'm Lisa Gonzales.

Today, Chris interviews Jeff Wilson, IT Director for Holly Springs, North Carolina.  In the summer of 2013, the Town Council voted to invest in municipal network infrastructure for anchor institutions.  Unfortunately, state barriers in North Carolina prevent Holly Springs from offering network services to businesses and residents.  Nevertheless, after careful consideration, the community determined that the investment would pay for itself by eliminating the need to pay incumbents for telecommunications.  A year later, the network is lit and serving community anchor institutions, while saving significant public dollars.  Even though state law precludes certain activities, Holly Springs hopes to encourage competition, via its infrastructure.  The network is bringing free Wi-Fi to much of the town's green spaces.  And Holly Springs is taking full advantage of its new asset, within the confines of North Carolina's law.

Here are Chris and Jeff, discussing the network in Holly Springs.

01:35:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today, I'm speaking with Jeff Wilson, the IT Director of Holly Springs, in North Carolina.  Welcome to the show.

01:47:

Jeff Wilson:  Thank you for having me.

01:48:

Chris:  So, Jeff, who don't you tell us a little bit about Holly Springs.  Where is it located?  What's interesting about it?

01:54:

Jeff:  Holly Springs -- it will soon be about 30,000 residents.  And we're just right outside of Raleigh.  We're in the same county as Raleigh, in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.  We are very much a commuter community, with a lot of people who are...

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Posted February 5, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 106 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Vince Jordan on lessons from Longmont, Colorado. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:15:

Vince Jordan:  You're as concerned, or more concerned, about the end user experience than you are just hooking up that next subscriber and getting that monthly subscription rate in and, you know, training them to put up with mediocre service -- which is what all the rest of the providers of the country do.

00:31:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello, and welcome again to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

This week, Vince Jordan, from Longmont, Colorado, returns to talk with Chris.  The last time Vince was with us, he was the Broadband Services Manager for Longmont Power & Communications.  Vince recently decided to spread his wings and is now concentrating on his firm Ridgeview Solutions.  He still has his fingers on the pulse of Longmont's network, however, and in this episode, he brings us up to speed on LPC's fiber network.

When we last spoke with Vince, Longmont had just started offering gigabit services and were in the throes of a referendum.  Longmont voters overwhelmingly passed a measure to bond in order to speed up the municipal network expansion, and the project is moving forward.  Vince offers some of the discoveries he and LPC have made along the way -- how they managed to keep services reasonably-priced.  And he offers great advice on the importance of customer service.

01:45:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  Today, I'm speaking with Vince Jordan.  We're back with Vince from Longmont, Colorado.  Welcome to the show.

01:56:

Vince Jordan:  Thank you, Chris.  Always a pleasure to be here and speak with you.

02:00:

Chris:  So, Vince, you're from Longmont.  You're still in that area.  But you've actually left the City of Longmont's employ, and you've gone back to your roots as an entrepreneur.  You are a private citizen, and the principal of Ridgeview Solutions, your -- the company you're working for -- your own company -- before...

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Posted February 5, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 105 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast on reflections from the Mountain Connect Rural Broadband Conference. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:15:

Chris Mitchell:  If there's anything that I learned from Colorado that was really reinforced, it's that I am in no position to decide how people in Colorado should be investing.

00:23:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello, and welcome again to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

In June, Chris attended the Mountain Connect World Broadband Conference in Vail, Colorado.  In addition to enjoying some beautiful scenery, Chris had the opportunity to touch base with local, state, and national colleagues.  In this interview, Chris took a few moments to describe the event for us.  He shared his impressions, what he learned from friends at the conference, and interesting developments in Colorado.  Longmont, Montrose, and Centennial have all decided to take back local authority by referendum.  Chris reflects on the state law, and how it has influenced connectivity in Colorado.  Events like Mountain Connect bring together the people who will learn the most from each other's experiences.  Springfield, Massachusetts, and Mount Vernon, Washington, will each be hosting broadband conferences this fall.  Details are available from the presentation tag on muninetworks.org.  Now let's hear about Chris' experience in Vail.

01:30:

Lisa:  How's it going, Chris?

01:31:

Chris Mitchell:  Hey, Lisa.

01:32:

Lisa:  So what have you been up to lately?

01:33:

Chris:  I just got back from Colorado.

01:35:

Lisa:  Colorado?  What were you doing in Colorado?

01:37:

Chris:  I was there for a broadband event.  I know, it may be surprising to you.  But I went to Colorado, and I didn't really spend any time outside.  I was there at a wonderful event called Mountain Connect.

01:50:

Lisa:  Right.  Yes.  I think that was in Vail, wasn't it?

01:53:

Chris:  Yes.  Vail, Colorado.  My first trip to this wonderful resort town...

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Posted February 5, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 104 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Hunter Newby on fiber as real estate with Allied Fiber. Listen to this episode.

 

00:15:

Hunter Newby:  If you don't have that underlying asset, in your state or in your country, they you're at a significant disadvantage, because you're going to have to figure out how to fund it.

00:23:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi there.  And welcome again to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, brought to you by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

Hunter Newby, founder and CEO of Allied Fiber, speaks with Chris this week.  Allied Fiber describes itself as a network-neutral dark fiber colocation and interconnection provider.  Allied is in the process of deploying dark fiber infrastructure across the continental United States.  The company is connecting the four corners of the lower forty-eight, linking up their network to international subsea cables.  To facilitate connections to its network, Allied is also installing colocation facilities at various points on the network.  Any customer who needs access to dark fiber can connect at these meet-me rooms.  In the interview, Hunter and Chris talk about Allied Fiber's approach, and the plan to use dark fiber to connect schools, hospitals, municipalities, private carriers, wireless towers, and a range of others.  We also encourage you to check out alliedfiber.com for more detail on the company, its progress, and its model.  Now let's hear from Chris and Hunter.

01:29:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today, I'm speaking with the founder and CEO of Allied Fiber, Hunter Newby.

01:40:

Hunter Newby:  Thanks, Chris.  Great to be on the show.

01:57:

Chris:  We met at the Mountain Connect Conference.  It was a great event, out there in Colorado.  Talking about rural networks.  And I had already been familiar with Allied Fiber, although I thought of it as just another long-haul, kind of tower-connecting project.  But it seems to be -- it's more interesting than that.  So why don't you tell us what you're doing?

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Posted February 5, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 135 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Lev Gonick on OneCommunity Model in northeast Ohio. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:08:

Lev Gonick:  You know, we are in many ways an interesting, if you will, third way for building out community fiber.  Neither a traditional telco incumbent way, and not a city- or City-Hall-driven municipal activity, but really run as a nonprofit.

00:26:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  This is the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

Lev Gonick, Co-founder and CEO of OneCommunity joins Chris today.  This nonprofit has forged an alternative method to better connectivity that does not involve dependence on distant corporate providers.  OneCommunity serves anchor institutions, businesses, schools, and local government in the northeast Ohio area with a community-minded approach.  Last fall, they announced the Big Gig Challenge, a call for gigabit project proposals that will incorporate their network.  The awards, recently announced, include grant funding up to 25 percent of the project costs.  In this interview, Lev discusses the Big Gig Challenge, the OneCommunity model, and how industrial northeast Ohio came to develop its future-proof resource.

We bring you the Community Broadband Bits Podcast ad-free each week.  But we need your support.  Please consider contributing to our work.  It's easy.  Go to ilsr.org and click on the orange "donate" button.  Every little bit helps.  Now here's Chris and Lev Gonick from OneCommunity.

01:39:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  Today, I'm talking with Lev Gonick, the Co-founder and CEO of OneCommunity in northeastern Ohio.  Welcome to the show.

01:53:

Lev Gonick:  Thanks, Chris, for having me.

01:55:

Chris:  Lev, you and I will be joined together in a panel soon, down in Austin, Texas, for Broadband Communities in April.  I feel like those panels are always a lot of fun.  And I think anyone who's listening to this show, if you're enjoying the relationship in the discussion that we have, you should definitely plan to...

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Posted February 2, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 114 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Keith Skelton and Danny Keith on the first muni fiber network in Oklahoma. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:15:

Danny Keith:  Small town anywhere isn't going to get this kind of technology.  They aren't going to be continually upgrading.  They're just going to be sucking 'em dry, taking their money and taking it somewhere else.

00:26:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi, and welcome to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

In 2005, DianmondNet began serving Sallisaw, as the first municipal network in Oklahoma in which the municipality offered triple-play services.  Before bringing fiber to the community, most residents were stuck with dial-up.  The network is popular with the locals, both for its services and for its determination to keep the network focused on community interests.  In addition to providing special local video content, DiamondNet prides itself on its ability to offer customer service from within the community.

In this interview, Chris talks with Keith Skelton, Assistant City Manager of Sallisaw, and Danny Keith, the Network Communication Supervisor for DiamondNet.  Keith and Danny share some of the problems they faced as a relatively small community trying to develop its own municipal network.  As with other communities we've talked to, connecting to the outside world was one of the biggest problems they faced.  The community has always supported this local effort, however, and DiamondNet has continued to make improvements and develop plans for the future.

Here are Keith, Danny, and Chris.

01:35:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  Today, I'm speaking with some folks down in Sallisaw, Oklahoma.  Welcome to the show, Keith Skelton, Assistant City Manager of the City of Sallisaw.

01:48:

Keith Skelton:  Thank you, Chris.  Glad to be here.

01:51:

Chris:  And also supporting, with some technical knowledge, we have Danny Keith, the Network Communications...

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