Tag: "transcript"

Posted February 2, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 103 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast on the Coalition for Local Internet Choice (CLIC). Listen to this episode here.

 

00:15:

Chris Mitchell:  The decision should be made locally.  And if people -- if local governments -- want to choose not to get involved, or if they want to choose their own way of working with the incumbent providers, then that's terrific.  And we support them to make that choice.

00:28:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi there. You're listening again to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, brought to you by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  And I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

Earlier this month, we wrote about a new organization, the Coalition for Local Internet Choice, also known as CLIC.  The organization advances the philosophy that Internet is an essential 21st century infrastructure, local communities are the lifeblood of America, and that local communities must be able to make their own choices.  In this edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, Chris, who is a Senior Advisor with CLIC, provided some back story on the creation of the coalition.  He also shared some tips on what you can do to advocate for local choice in your community.  If you feel that your community is best suited to decide its own Internet destiny, you need to join the coalition, and make your voice heard.  We encourage you to check out the CLIC website at localnetchoice.org and follow the organization on Twitter.  The handle is @localnetchoice.

01:27:

Chris Mitchell:  Hey, Lisa, can you come over here?

91:29:

Lisa:  Hey, Chris.  So what's going on?

01:30:

Chris:  Hey, I just wanted to tell you about this great new organization: the Coalition for Local Internet Choice, or CLIC.

01:37:

Lisa:  I think I've heard a little bit about that.  Why don't you describe it a little bit better?

01:40:

Chris:  I think you might have written a little bit about it already.  Yes.  But I'll tell you about it.  It's the Coalition for Local Internet Choice -- the idea being that every community should be able to decide locally, for itself, if it's smart to make its own investments in Internet access, or if they...

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Posted February 2, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 102 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Vic Zimmerman on a local fiber partnership in Monticello, Illinois. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Vic Zimmerman:  Five years from now, we'll look back and realize what an awesome community asset that these four entities went together to insure was brought to Monticello.

00:21:

Liza Gonzalez:  Hi there, and welcome to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, brought to you by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzales.

There is a new partnership in Monticello, Illinois:  the school district, the Allerton Public Library, the city, and Piatt County are joining forces to improve local connectivity.  A few years ago, the community learned that a private company was installing a fiber line through the community for mobile wireless purposes.  They approached them and proposed a mutually beneficial arrangement, to create savings for all parties.  Their network has recently connected to the public schools, eliminating the need for the district to lease multiple T1 lines.  They now save public dollars and get the connectivity they need.  The remaining entities will likely be connected by the end of the summer.  Monticello is one of an increasing number of stories we encounter in which public entities, realizing the strength of collaboration, band together to create new opportunities.

Chris caught up with Vic Zimmerman, Superintendent of Monticello's Community Unified School District, Number 25.

01:25:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today, I'm speaking with Vic Zimmerman, Superintendent for the Monticello schools in Illinois.  Welcome to the show.

01:38:

Vic Zimmerman:  Glad to be a part of it.

01:39:

Chris:  We learned about your interesting approach to connecting the schools and anchor institutions over a Google Alert, and didn't know much about the Monticello schools beforehand, or the region.  So perhaps you can start by telling us a little bit about what that area is like in Illinois.

01:57:

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Posted February 2, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 101 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Matt Wood on Title II and Network Neutrality. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Matt Wood:  Having new tolls put up and collected by Verizon and AT&T and Comcast and these giants in the middle of the network will benefit those giant companies, but it will hurt all the rest of us.

00:21:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello there.  You're listening to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

If you're listening to our podcast, you're probably pretty savvy about the network neutrality debate.  As you know, the conversation is stirring about the right of ISPs to charge more for what's been labeled a "fast lane."  At muninetworks.org, we refer to the practice as "paid prioritization."  This week, Chris interviews Free Press Policy Director Matt Wood.  The Free Press is one of the organizations dedicated to educating the general public, and helping them participate in developing Internet policy.  Innovations and technology are now forcing us to re-examine telecommunications policy.  Media consolidation and their powerful lobbying machines drown out the voice of consumers.  Matt helps explain the idea behind the possibility of Title II classification, the FCC's roles in the open Internet, and the consequences we can expect from paid prioritization.  Here are Chris and Matt.

01:26:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today, I'm speaking with Matt Wood, with the Free Press.  Matt is the Policy Director of this DC-based organization, which has been critical to safeguarding the open Internet.  Welcome to the show.

01:45:

Matt Wood:  Thanks, Chris.  Great to be here.

01:46:

Chris:  You know, I just actually called you  DC-based, and you've got a lot of people in Massachusetts.  You're all over the place.  Why don't you tell us a little bit about Free Press?

01:55:

Matt:  Sure.  Yeah.  We're all over the place physically, but hopefully not with our ideas.  We are both inside and...

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Posted February 2, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 100 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Dr. Robert Wack on Westminster's pending open access fiber network. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Dr. Robert Wack:  They heard about our network.  And now, in addition to moving the distribution facilities down, they're also going to moving their -- some portion of their IT operations down here, to avail themselves of the network that we're building.

00:23:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi there, again.  You're listening to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

We started covering the Maryland community of Westminster in 2012.  Businesses in Westminster have struggled with the lack of broadband.  But community leaders are now taking matters into their own hands.  In recent months, the town has moved forward with an initiative to improve local connectivity.  Interest is high, even before hanging or burying a single mile of fiber.  As it prepares for 2015, the City Council has included $6.3 million of funding in its budget for a broadband pilot project.  The community just issued its request for proposals on May 22nd.

Dr. Robert Wack, a member of the Westminster City Council, visited with Chris about the project.  Dr. Wack has played an instrumental role in the project planning from the beginning of the initiative.  We often discuss broadband as it relates to telehealth.  In this interview, Dr. Wack describes one of his own personal experiences.  Here are Chris and Dr. Robert Wack, from Westminster.

01:31:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today, I'm speaking with Dr. Robert Wack, City Council member of Westminster, Maryland.  Welcome to the show.

01:43:

Dr. Robert Wack:  Thanks, Chris.

01:44:

Chris:  It's terrific to have you on the show.  We've been following Westminster pretty closely, because I think you have a really innovative model, in terms of how you're going about building this fiber network that will be owned by the...

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Posted February 2, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 115 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Richard Bates on the first muni fiber net in Maine - Rockport. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Richard Bates:  It just seemed like if the town was going to step up and help do this, then the town should own the network.

00:16:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi, and welcome again to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

Richard Bates, Town Manager of Rockport, Maine, joins Chris, to discuss the state's first municipal fiber network.  An established media arts school in this harbor town needed high-capacity connectivity -- a rarity in a town of less than 4,000 people.  Town leaders saw a partnership opportunity to give the college the connectivity it needed while simultaneously creating an economic development tool.  This project is small compared to many other networks we examine, but it underscores the fact that each town is unique, and should have the freedom to do what it takes to meet its needs.  Here are Chris and Richard.

00:59:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  Today, we're speaking with Richard Bates, the Town Manager of Rockport, Maine -- the first municipal network in Maine.  Welcome to the show.

01:12:

Richard Bates:  Thank you.  Thanks.  Great to be here.

01:15:

Chris:  I'm excited to have you on the show, and to talk about Maine.  I've been up there a number of times.  Why don't you start by telling us a little bit about Rockport.

01:24:

Richard:  Rockport's a beautiful little community, kind of nestled between Camden and Rockland, on Route 1.  And one of my goals in being here was to get us known as more than that quaint little village that's between Camden and Rockland, on Route 1, while people are driving to Arcadia.  And to bring some attention to this beautiful place.  And some jobs, and economic development, and diversity to the community.

01:53:

Chris:  And about how many people are in Rockport?

01:57:

Richard:  About 3300.

01:58:

Chris:  And I'm guessing they don't all live right...

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Posted February 2, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 99 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Mark Erickson and Cindy Gerholz on RS Fiber coop in Minnesota. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Mark Erickson:  The folks in the cities decided that everybody was going to be the same.  We exist because of the farmers.  And the farmers exist because of us.

00:18:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello there.  You're listening to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  And I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

In rural Minnesota, a project is underway that will significantly improve access for people in the region.  The project was originally intended to expand over Renville and Sibley Counties, but over the past three years, it evolved into a model we expect to see more of in the future: a fiber cooperative.  Today, two guests join Chris to talk about the project.  Mark Erickson, City Administrator of Winthrop, Minnesota, and Cindy Gerholz, Vice Chair of the RS Fiber Coop.

The fiber-to-the-farm project focuses on getting broadband to everyone, because everyone in the area recognizes its area utility.  Cindy and Mark describe the poor connectivity situation in the area, and how residents are fixing it, through community ownership.  More rural communities, recognizing that large corporate providers will not expand to areas without dense populations, are taking action to serve themselves.  The RS Fiber Cooperative model brings access to everyone who wants it and gives everyone a voice.

Before we run the interview, we want to refer you specifically to the rsfiber.coop page and the Renville-Sibley Facebook page. In addition to information about the project, you can check out the tools RS Fiber advocates are using to reach out to potential coop members.

Now, here are Chris, Mark, and Cindy.

01:45:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today, I'm speaking with two folks:  Mark Erickson, the City Administrator of Winthrop.  Mark, welcome to the show.

01:57:

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Posted February 2, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 98 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Rick Smith on the municipal open access fiber netowrk in Cortez, Colorado. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Rick Smith:  I'm kind of proud to say we were able to impact about 250 of those businesses, which -- you know, you've got to take this in baby steps.

00:19:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  You are listening to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

The Director of General Services for the City of Cortez, Colorado, Rick Smith, joins Chris this week to dig into the story of the community's fiber network.  Rick explains how the community incrementally expanded that asset to what is now an "open access" network.  They faced a few challenges, but designed their business model to fit the community.  As a result, their network has flourished.  Here are Rick and Chris.

00:52:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today, I'm speaking with the Director of General Services for the City of Cortez in Colorado.  Rick Smith, welcome to the show.

01:07:

Rick Smith:  Thank you, Chris.

01:09:

Chris:  Rick, you and I have been talking for a number of years, off and on.  You've been doing some really interesting work down there with fiber optics, both in your community and within your local larger region.  And, actually, I should say, as well, I've been through Cortez.  My wife and I came through right after a bunch of snow fell.  It was beautiful.  And, down there in the southwest corner of Colorado.  So, why don't you describe the community a little bit, for people who haven't had the privilege of being there?

01:37:

Rick:  Well, a lot of your listeners will be aware of Mesa Verde National Park.  We're about 16 miles away from that.  We consider ourselves kind of a gateway to Mesa Verde.  We are, as you said, in the extreme southwest portion of Colorado.  We're about 20 miles from the Four Corners, where you can step on all four states at one time.  Cortez itself is a small...

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Posted February 2, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 97 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Jack Belcher and Lou Michael on community network in Arlington, Virginia. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Jack Belcher:  They just want to know if they can get access to that high speed, and they can get it in a secure manner, and they can get to places not only in the county but elsewhere.

00:19:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  You are listening to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

Recently, Arlington County, Virginia, announced that it would begin offering dark fiber services to local businesses through its ConnectArlington project.  The county expects to make the service available by 2015.  In this episode, Chris talks with Jack Belcher, CIO of Arlington County, and also Lou Michael, the project's Chief Architect.  The county began to develop its own Inet just a few years ago, rather than renew a franchise agreement with Comcast.  Since then, Arlington County has taken advantage of every opportunity to install conduit and fiber.  As a result, they now have a network that serves public facilities, public safety, and soon will be serving local businesses with dark fiber.  In this conversation, Chris, Jack, and Lou discuss Arlington's careful planning toward their long-term goal.  This local community realized that a community network was not only a way to improve quality-of-life but a necessary infrastructure.  They achieved their goal, and the network is already paying off.  Here Chris, Jack, and Lou.

01:28:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today I'm speaking with Jack Belcher, the Chief Information Officer for Arlington County, Virginia.  Welcome to the show.

01:40:

Jack Belcher:  Thank you.  Thanks for inviting us.

01:42:

Chris:  We also have a couple other people in the room.  We've got Lou Michael, the Chief Architect of the system.  Welcome.

01:47:

Lou Michael:  Thank you.

01:48:

Chris: ...

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Posted January 29, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 96 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Scott Bradner on network peering. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Scott Bradner:  And so, you either get money from Peter or Paul or both.  But the money has to come from someplace to build up the infrastructure.

00:18:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  You are listening again to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

Daniel, from Bozeman, Montana, asked for a podcast on peering.  So we reached out to Scott Bradner.  In addition to many other accomplishments, Scott is a member of the Internet Engineering Task Force.  And he's a former columnist for Network World.  As Scott puts it, he's been in the biz, for many years.

Peering is the process by which two Internet networks connect and exchange traffic.  While we stream a movie or send pics to our family, we don't concern ourselves with the business arrangements between ISPs and carriers.  Maybe we should.  Or we should at least have a basic understanding of how peering works, because it does affect our use of the Internet.  As federal officials discuss the Time Warner [Cable] Comcast merger and network neutrality, the media is focusing more on peering.  While it's a good thing to make more people aware of the process, it's better to have people like Scott to offer an expert's opinion.

The discussion gets a little technical near the beginning, but if you shy away from tech talk, keep listening.  The interview gets deeper into how peering may or may not affect network neutrality -- and the potential merger.  Here are Chris and Scott.

01:29:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today, I'm speaking Scott Bradner, someone who has been working on the Internet for many years.  Welcome to the show.

01:42:

Scott Bradner:  Thank you.  Glad to be here.

01:44:

Chris:  You've been a long-time member of the Internet Engineering Task Force of the Internet Society.  I got to know you, I think, because of your role of Internet governance, and some of the people that you've known for a long time.  And you've...

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Posted January 29, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for the episode 95 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Virgil Turner on community network in Montrose, Colorado. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Virgil Turner:  We think about our citizens in a different way.  Not just what -- the amount of profit I can extract from our citizens, but what we really need to do to help our citizens?

00:22:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  You are listening to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  And I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

On April 1st, the voters in Montrose, Colorado, voted yes on Measure A.  The decision allows the community to establish a telecommunications utility.  In 2005, state statute took away that right.  In this episode, Chris talks with Virgil Turner, Director of Innovation and Citizen Engagement in Montrose.  Virgil describes an all-too-familiar scenario in Montrose, a place where the quality of life is high except for one thing: residents and businesses cannot get the connectivity they need from incumbents.  Montrose voters have spoken, and community leaders are ready to take a thoughtful approach that focuses on local needs.  Here are Chris and Virgil.

01:09:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today I'm speaking with Virgil Turner, the Director of Innovation and Citizen Engagement for the City of Montrose in Colorado.  Welcome to the show.

01:24:

Virgil Turner:  Hi, Chris.  Thanks for having me.

01:27:

Chris:  Absolutely.  Thanks for coming on.  Last time I was in Colorado, it was hard to leave.  It was just the beginning of spring, and I was in Longmont and Fort Collins.  And just seeing those mountains in the background made it hard to think about ever leaving them.  So, why don't you tell us a little bit about Montrose?  I understand that you're situated among those mountains.

01:49:

Virgil:  We are.  We're nestled in a high valley, at 5800 feet above sea level.  We're in western Colorado, situated about 60 miles from the Utah border.  We have mountains surrounding us, and public lands.  It's an absolutely gorgeous place to be.  We're...

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