Tag: "transcript"

Posted January 29, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 116 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast on reflections from the Internet Governance Forum. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hey, everybody.  This is the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  This is Lisa and Chris.  Hey, Chris.

00:16:

Chris Mitchell:  You know, you could say that a little more forcefully: THIS IS THE COMMUNITY BROADBAND BITS PODCAST.

00:21:

Lisa:  I could, but I don't want to step on your purview.  You're good at that.  What's going on, Chris?  Where have you been?  You've been gone for a while.

00:29:

Chris:  I've been all over the place, and I've learned a lot, as usual.  But the most interesting place was probably Istanbul...

00:36:

Lisa:  Oh!

00:36:

Chris:  ... for the Internet Governance Forum -- what was that, two weeks ago, now, I think.

00:39:

Lisa:  Tell us about that.  What was the purpose of the Internet Governance Forum?

00:44:

Chris:  Well, it's interesting.  The Internet Governance Forum is something that I'm still trying to wrap my head around.  This is a mechanism that allows what some call stakeholders -- the idea that anyone who has something to say, or has a stake in the way the Internet is governed -- which, I would say, is EVERYONE -- but it's a way to try and figure out how you govern something like the Internet, which is so large, it's beyond borders.  We don't want to trust governments to do it.  You know, you don't want Russia speaking for the people of Russia, because, frankly, I think Putin's interests are quite different from that of small businesses and people living in Russia.  You also don't want businesses to be taking over all of it.  You want to make sure that we have some input from everyone.

And so, there's this thing called multi-stakeholder-ism, or a multi-stakeholder process.  The idea is, basically, once a year, everyone comes together and talks about key issues, in terms of Internet governance.  This is everything from the way that the IP system works; to how we deal with child pornography; to network neutrality, which is a global issue; to all kinds of other things...

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Posted January 29, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 94 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with John St. Julien on how to start a community network. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

John St. Julien:  I think that a lot of communities could do this kind of thing.  In our case, the real linchpin was just a few people, who were willing to devote significant time to it.

00:19:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  You are listening again to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  And I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

We've spoken with John St. Julien before about grassroots change.  St. Julien was one of the driving forces behind the movement to bring fiber to Lafayette, Louisiana, in 2005.  Often, people contact us because they know their community needs better connectivity, but they don't know where to start.  Getting a local coalition started to educate the community can be difficult.  When deep-pocketed incumbents step into the picture, educating your community gets even harder.  Nevertheless, it can be done.  St. Julien shares some of the strategies Lafayette used to keep up its network momentum.  Here are Chris and John.

01:02:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell, with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  And today, we're once again speaking with John St. Julien from Lafayette, Louisiana.  Welcome to the show.

01:16:

John St. Julien:  Hi, Chris.

01:17:

Chris:  It's good to have you back again.  You're one of our favorite people to talk about anytime we're thinking about grassroots solutions to broadband challenges.  You were essential in crafting the grassroots movement that led to this incredible network that you now have in Lafayette, against some really incredible opposition, from Bell South -- now AT&T -- and Cox Cable.

And before you say that you were part of a larger group, we know that.  And we know that you're very modest.  So, thanks for coming on.

01:48:

John:  Well, you're welcome.  I always enjoy our conversations.

01:52:

Chris:  I really wanted to talk to you today about the kind of steps that anyone...

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Posted January 29, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 93 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Michael Curri on the benefits of increased broadband utilization. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Michael Curri:  That is actually much more significant, in terms of benefits -- that economic base -- than the actual initial expenditure.  Our calculations are about a tenfold factor increase in GDP relative to the infrastructure investment.

00:25:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello, there.  Once again, you are listening to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  And this is Lisa Gonzalez.

Once again, Chris was able to connect with a guest on the road.  This time, he was in Des Moines for the Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities Broadband Conference.  Chris took a few moments to sit down with Michael Curri, an economist with the Strategic Networks Group, or SNG.  SNG works with economic development agencies, municipal networks, business associations, electric utilities, and private network operators.  SNG collects data on how businesses and communities use broadband.  By analyzing utilization from a regional perspective, these groups can tailor planning, to get the most out of broadband investment.

Measuring all the benefits of community networks is always a challenge.  Balance sheets are important, but there are many positive effects born out of community networks that can't be measured by traditional means.  SNG is finding a way to link those seemingly immeasurable factors to economic growth.  Here are Michael and Chris, discussing SNG's work and their findings.

01:29:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast -- hotel room edition.  I'm Chris Mitchell, and I'm here with Michael Curri.  Welcome to the show.

01:39:

Michael Curri:  Well, thank you very much for having me.

01:40:

Chris:  We're here at the Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities' conference dealing with telecommunications issues, in Des Moines.  And we have an opportunity to pull up two chairs and to talk a little bit about the sorts of data that you collect and analyze.  Tell us what you do...

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Posted January 29, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 92 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Mike Foor on Georgia Communications Cooperative. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Mike Foor:  The goal is, if we can drive economic development, if we can improve the education in the area, you know, those things are our goals.  And then, Lord willing, we can break even at that, as well, and continue to grow.

00:23:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  You are listening to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  I'm Lisa Gonzalez.  Hey, Happy April Fools' Day.

Recently, Chris was in Raleigh, North Carolina.  He was at a conference held by the Southeast Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors, also known as SEATOA.  In addition to receiving the 2014 Community Broadband Advocacy Award, he visited with Michael Foor, President and CEO of the Georgia Communications Cooperative.  GCC is one of the partners involved in deploying the North Georgia Network.  The North Georgia Network was the first project to receive American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds.  Now, GCC has its own network, called Trailwave.  That's a fiber network that provides last-mile connectivity to residents and businesses.  Cooperatives like GCC know the territory, they understand delivery challenges, and they have a special connection with customers.  So, in that regard, they play an important role in bringing together last-mile and middle-mile projects.  Cooperatives are also owned and operated by those they serve.  So business decisions are not always driven only by the desire to increase profits.  When exploring plans to build local networks, cooperatives like GCC can be reliable partners.  Here are Michael and Chris in Raleigh, talking about life as a cooperative.

01:44:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today, I'm speaking with Michael Foor, President and CEO of the Georgia Communications Cooperative.  Welcome to the show.

01:55:

Mike Foor:  Thank you.  Glad to be hear, Chris.

01:57:

Chris:  So, we spoke with Paul Belk on a...

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Posted January 29, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 91 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast on overbuliding and expanding Internet access in rural area. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Chris Mitchell:  I'm sorry, your town can't get an interstate, because you've already got dirt roads -- and that's good enough for you.

Hello, everyone.  It's the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  Again, we're doing a little format change, where it's just Lisa and I today talking.  I'm Chris Mitchell, with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

00:29:

Lisa Gonzalez:  And this is Lisa Gonzalez, also with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

00:33:

Chris:  That's why your office is right across the hall.  I was wondering that.

00:36:

Lisa:  Go figure.

00:37:

Chris:  We're going to talk about overbuilding today.  And, in particular, when it makes sense.  The practice of overbuilding is somewhat controversial -- the idea of building a new network where there's already an existing network.  "Overbuilding," the term, comes from sort of cable competition.  When the cable companies wanted to brand competition negatively, they called it "overbuilding," because it would be unnecessary to ever have a choice in providers.

But this all comes about because of this really interesting new report.  Have you heard about this new report?

01:08:

Lisa:  Well, being one of the authors, I have heard a little something about it.

01:11:

Chris:  I'm glad to hear that.

01:13:

Lisa:  We just released a report.  It's titled, "Minnesota Local Governments Advance Super-Fast Internet Networks."  The report looks at five communities in greater Minnesota.  They've all put in incredible fiber networks.  And we told about the different approaches they took.  One of the communities that we looked at was Lac qui Parle County.

01:34:

Chris:  This overbuilding subject also came up in the state legislature, which has been considering some policy changes to remove barriers to municipal networks, as well as encouraging partnerships.  And even rolling out a loan fund that would encourage rural networks, often...

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Posted January 29, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for episode 86 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Bruce Patterson on the network in Ammon, Idaho. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:06:

Bruce Patterson:  We build the road.  And we let anybody that wants to use them use them.  So, the commercial enterprises on those roads might FedEx, UPS, or the U.S. Postal Service.  We are not those entities.  We are the entity that builds and maintains the roads.  So we're completely open.

00:23:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi, there.  You are again listening to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

In this episode, Chris connects with Bruce Patterson.  He's the Technology Director for the City of Ammon, Idaho.  Ammon began by building its network to connect a few municipal facilities.  City leaders realized they could save some money, and control internal connections, if they built the network themselves, rather than leasing from a private company.  The open access network now saves public dollars, provides needed connectivity, and even brings in some revenue.  Ammon was one of the many communities that applied for, but did not receive, federal stimulus dollars, under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act.  The story is compelling, because city leaders united together to pursue their vision and make it a reality.  Today, the network also serves businesses, schools, and libraries.  Ammon hopes to extend the network benefits even farther into the community.  Here are Chris and Bruce, discussing the network in Ammon, Idaho.

01:22:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today, I'm speaking with Bruce Patterson, the City of Ammon Technology Director -- out there in Idaho.  Welcome to the show.

01:35:

Bruce Patterson:  Thank you, Chris.  I appreciate you inviting me.

01:37:

Chris:  Absolutely.  I've been watching Ammon for a long time.  I think you're doing some very interesting things.  You're certainly blazing a trail in Idaho.  Some of the first in the state.  But let's start with a little bit of background, for people who aren't familiar with Ammon. ...

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Posted January 29, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for proving the transcript for the episode 117 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with David Asp and Rosalee McCready on "Dig Once" policy that enriched fiber network in Dakota County. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:06:

David Asp:  There's got to be key people who have the knowledge base to be able to see to it that things get done.

00:12:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi, and welcome to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  This is Lisa Gonzalez.

David Asp, Network Collaboration Engineer for Dakota County, and Rosalee McCready, .Net Systems Analyst, join Chris this week to talk about the county's fiber optic network.  Serving schools, libraries, and a long list of public facilities, the network keeps operations coordinated, while saving public dollars.  One of the factors that helped community leaders expand the reach of the network is a long-standing "dig-once" policy, and the culture that has emanated from it.  Recognizing the savings, benefits, and value of "dig-once" to other entities working in Dakota County personnel developed any and all opportunities to collaborate.  Chris, David, and Rosalee discuss the inspiration for establishing the collaborative approach that led to the network's success.  For some communities, especially in rural areas, smart policies, like "dig-once," collaboration, and innovation are a must for a successful result.

01:16:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell.  And today I'm speaking with two folks from a little bit south of me, in the Dakota County Department of Information Technology.  I've got David Asp, a Network Collaboration Engineer.  Welcome to the show.

01:33:

David Asp:  Thank you.

01:34:

Chris:  And Rosalee McCready, .Net Systems Analyst.  Welcome to the show.

01:38:

Rosalee McCready:  Thank you.

01:39:

Chris:  Well, I'm very excited to have both of you on, because, frankly, there's a lot of talk about "dig-once" type approaches.  And I think some of it is aspirational, and a lot of it really hasn't been figured out, in many cases...

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Posted January 29, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for the episode 55 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Chris and Lisa on "overbuilding" in Part Two of 'Crazy Talk'. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:20:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello.  This is the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  And I'm Lisa Gonzalez.

In a past episode, we listened to common arguments from telecommunication company lobbyists that Chris had recorded at an event in Wisconsin.  We chose three typical statements, and addressed them, one by one.  This week, we travel back a bit to June 2011 and Washington DC.  Chris participated in a debate sponsored by the Information Technology Innovation Foundation.  Rob Atkinson, President of the foundation, put forth several arguments.  We chose three of his arguments and examine them for part two of our "Crazy Talk" series.  We talk about the concept of "overbuilding,"  the claim that building in the U.S. is more challenging than in other parts of the world, and the misconception that subscribers demand nothing more than minimal speeds.  Even through Mr. Atkinson argued these points two years ago, they're the same sound bites lobbyists use today.  Let's jump right in.

01:17:

Rob Atkinson:  I just don't see any rationale for the federal government -- or state government -- funding overbuilders.  It just, to me, is a waste of societal resources when we have, according to the FCC -- what is it? -- around 8, 9 percent of homes, communities -- households that cannot get broadband.  There's a real reason they can't get broadband.  It's not that the providers are nefarious or selfish.  It's because it costs more to give them than you can get in revenues.

01:43:

Chris Mitchell:  Well, let me ask you, Lisa -- when we start off about this, let me ask you, when you hear the term "overbuilder," what does that mean to you?

01:51:

Lisa:  When I hear the term "overbuilder," I think of something that's unnecessary.  I think of something that is predatory.  Those are the first two words that come to mind for me.

02:05:

Chris:  So, this is something that industry often uses, right?  I mean, a lot of us think of having multiple...

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Posted January 26, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript for the episode 90 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Jory Wolf on the fiber approach in Santa Monica, California. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Jory Wolf:  We knew what it was like not to own this asset.  We knew what it was like to lease it from others.  And it became clear to us that this was something that we weren't going to bleed through the nose on.  We were actually going to own it.

00:24:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hello there.  You are listening to the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.  And this is Lisa Gonzalez.

Today, Chris visits with Jory Wolf, Chief Information Officer for the City of Santa Monica.  We just released a report on City Net, Santa Monica's awesome fiber network.  The network now serves businesses of all sizes with dark and lit fiber, as well as government facilities, schools, and libraries.  And it even facilitates a free Wi-Fi network for the public.

Many communities that deploy their own fiber networks own municipal electric utilities.  This is a distinct advantage.  That's not the case in Santa Monica.  Santa Monica's path, an incremental build that required no debt, provides a possible option for other communities similarly situated.  Here are Jory and Chris.

01:11:

Chris Mitchell:  Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  I'm Chris Mitchell, today speaking with Jory Wolf, CIO for the City of Santa Monica.  Welcome to the show.

01:21:

Jory Wolf:  Thank you, Christopher.

01:22:

Chris:  It's wonderful to have you on.  We've been talking for the past year or so, as we gathered research for the report we've just released, on Santa Monica City Net, a network run out of your Information Systems Department.  So, congratulations on such a wonderful network, and I'm glad we're able to bring some attention to it.

01:40:

Jory:  Thank you.  And thanks for showing the interest in our story.

01:44:

Chris:  Absolutely.  That's what we're going to talk about today.  And I'd like to start by just giving people a sense of what Santa Monica is like, for the...

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Posted January 26, 2015 by

Thanks to Jeff Hoel for providing the transcript of the episode 88 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast with Chris Mitchell on the overview of Stockholm's Stokab. Listen to this episode here.

 

00:10:

Chris Mitchell:  But I think that if we look at this over many decades of time, if you're a city that figures out how to get a lot of fiber in the ground, and you make it available on reasonable terms, over a long period of time, you're going to be really better off.

00:24:

Lisa Gonzalez:  Hi, there.  Welcome again to the Community ....

00:26:

Chris:  Welcome to the -- hey, wait a minute.

00:28:

Lisa:  Oh, oh, oh, Chris.  Hi, Chris.

00:31:

Chris:  Good morning.

00:33:

Lisa:  You weren't here, so I thought I'd, you know, just sort of take over.

00:36:

Chris:  Yeah, that works.  You'd probably do a wonderful job.  I look forward to it.

00:40:

Lisa:  Um.  Hey, everybody.  We're back at the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.  And this time we're doing something a little different.  We like to shake it up once in a while.  Chris just got back from a visit to Stockholm, Sweden.

00:52:

Chris:  I was at an event in Stockholm called "Fiber: the Key to Creating World-Class IT Regions," which followed the European Fiber-to-the-Home Council event, which is a yearly event.  It's actually incredibly large -- 6,000 people, and a very large convention center.  And it was very cool.  I spent two days getting a better sense of how Europe deals with fiber.  I had a lot of great conversations with people.  And then I finished it off by talking about fiber in North America and in the United States, and sort of what we got right, and what isn't working so well.  And did some Q&A.  And then I hopped on a long flight home.

01:31:

Lisa:  So, tell me how you found it.  Was it -- had you been there before?  Or was it the first time to Sweden?  Or -- tell me how the experience was, just for you personally.

01:39:

Chris:  Well, it was wonderful.  I mean, Stockholm was great.  It was a little warm for my taste -- right around freezing.  Whereas here, we were a lot colder than that.

01:47...

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