Tag: "transcript"

Posted August 7, 2018 by Staff

This is the transcript for episode 317 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher Mitchell and Hannah Trostle discuss our recently released report Profiles of Monopoly: Big Cable and Telecom.

Listen to this episode here.

Hannah Trostle: So if Comcast is in one house and Charter's in another house and they are on opposite sides of the census block, and no one else in the middle can actually get service from either of them, that whole census block is marked as a "competitive census block," where all the people have all of the options for service.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 317 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. If you live in an urban area, you may have a choice of Internet access providers and you may even have access to more than one that offers broadband. As a reminder, the FCC defines broadband as a minimum advertised speeds of 25 megabits per second download and three megabits per second upload. Chances are, if you live in rural America, your options are not nearly as diverse. In our new report, "Profiles of Monopoly: Big Cable and Telecom," we examined data available from the FCC and mapped out exactly where broadband competition exists in the U.S., and where it doesn't. In this week's podcast, Christopher interviews Hannah Trostle, who research and analyze the data to create the maps for the report. She and Christopher then analyze the results and describe their findings in this conversation. You can access the report at ILSR.org/monopoly-networks, or find it at Muninetworks.org. Now, here's Christopher and Hannah.

Christopher Mitchell: Hannah, welcome to your last week at ILSR.

Hannah Trostle: Yes, it's good to be leaving.

Christopher Mitchell: I don't think it's good for you to be leaving, but I appreciate that you have to get on with your life, and we'll get on with the podcast. Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self Reliance, ILSR. Here for one last time in studio, at least for...

Read more
Posted August 1, 2018 by Staff

This is the transcript for Episode 316 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. Justin Holzgrove of Mason County PUD 3 in Washington and Isak Finer from COS Systems discuss the expansion plans in Mason County and how COS Systems is helping the utility determine a strategic deployment approach. Listen to this episode here.

Justin Holzgrove: Absolutely, we provide the biggest pipe we can, and what you do with it is up to you.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 316 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. In Mason County, Washington the local Public Utility District, Mason PUD 3 is building out it's open access network so residents and businesses can have access to the benefits of the fiber infrastructure. In order to take a strategic approach to better determine success, Mason PUD is working with COS Systems. By collaborating, they're better able to predict take-rates, estimate costs, and make adjustments to their plan when needed. In this interview, Christopher talks with Isak Finer from COS Systems and Justin Holzgrove for Mason PUD 3. In addition to a discussion as to how Mason PUD 3 is using Service Zones from COS Systems, we get to learn a little about the origin of Service Zones and how it helps with planning and establishing funding for deployment. Christopher, Isak and Justin also touch on the definition of open access and how it varies from place to place. Learn more about COS Systems and Service Zones cossystems.com. You can also listen to our Community Broadband Bits podcast episode 274 for our earlier conversation with Justin. Now here's Christopher with Isak Finer from COS Systems and Justin Holzgrove from Mason PUD 3.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self Reliance up in Minneapolis, Minnesota. And today I'm speaking with Isak Finer, chief marketing officer for COS Systems. Welcome to the show, Isak.

Isak Finer: Thank you. It's great to be here.

Christopher Mitchell: And we also have returning guest, Justin Holzgrove with the Mason PUD 3, telecommunications and community relations manager. Actually, what I should say...

Read more
Posted July 25, 2018 by Staff

This is the transcript for episode 315 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. Matt Larson of Vistabeam Internet joins the show via Mountain Connect in Colorado. Listen to this episode here.

 

Matt Larson: If there's a place that that we can figure out a way to get to them, and get them a better level of service, even if all it does is inspire the other providers there to step their game up and provide a better level of service, I consider that to be kind of a good job to try and do.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 315 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. Back in June, while Christopher was at the Mountain Connect conference in Vail, Colorado, he had the chance to sit down with several speakers at the conference, including Matt Larson, founder of Vistabeam Internet. The company began offering wireless Internet back in 2004 and has since expanded. They now provide services in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska. In this interview, Matt explains his motivations for continuing to grow the company and their service area, which now covers approximately 40,000 miles. He describes how Vistabeam has helped create competition in rural areas where residents were one stuck with what they had, and how that competition has inspired incumbents to improve services. Matt also describes what it's like in the field, deploying their equipment. He also talks about daily challenges and working with different agencies for funding opportunities. His insight explains how the company grew to become the 2018 Provider of the Year, the award they took home from the Mountain Connect conference. Learn more about the company at Vistabeam.com. Now here's Christopher with Matt Larson from Vistabeam Internet.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell from the Institute for Local Self Reliance. Today I'm in Vail, Colorado for the Mountain Connect event, one of the my favorite events. I'm sitting across from one of the sponsors of it, and someone who just won an award. We'll talk about that a little bit. Matt Larson, the wireless cowboy and founder of Vistabeam. Welcome to the show.

Matt Larson:...

Read more
Posted July 17, 2018 by Staff

This is the transcript for episode 314 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. John Gavan and Brad Harding from Colorado join the show to discuss economic development, electric cooperatives, and broadband service. Listen to this episode here.

 

Brad Harding: It really came from a concern for the community. At that time, we had just lost a 300 - 325 member coal mine. So we sat around the table for probably the better part of the year and said what can we do to change this, and at the same time we were also dreaming big.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 314 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. Colorado communities have been busy over the past few years, and that includes the folks in Delta and Montrose counties. Back in June, while Christopher was at the Mountain Connect event, he sat down with John Gavan from Delta County Economic Development and Brad Harding of First Colorado National Bank. Both are on the board of the local electric cooperative, the Delta Montrose Electric Association or DMEA. DMEA is involved in developing its infrastructure to bring high-quality connectivity to members. They're also exploring new uses for their infrastructure that involve innovations in the electrical generation and storage field. In this interview, Christopher, John and Brad talk about the impetus behind the infrastructure project, funding and how the co-op member helped drive the project by showing up and expressing their need for broadband. Learn more about the Elevate project at DMEA.com. Now, here's Christopher with John Gavan and Brad Harding from the Delta Montrose Electric Association.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self Reliance and I'm still in Vail, Colorado, not as you're listening to this, but as I'm recording it at the Mountain Connect event, one of my favorite broadband conferences in the nation. Today I'm sitting here talking to two folks from the Delta, Montrose counties of Colorado. Let me introduce you to John Gavan, president of Delta County Economic Development. Welcome to the show.

John Gavan: Thanks very...

Read more
Posted July 11, 2018 by Staff

This is the transcript for episode 313 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. Terry Huval of LUS Fiber reflects on the process of creating a community network. Listen to this episode here.

 

Terry Huval: There never was a level playing field in Louisiana and it still is not. Our competitors have far more resources and play much harder ball politics than anything we could, we could do on our own. We're fortunate we have a community that was brave enough to support our vision to put this system in place.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 313 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. The folks in Lafayette, Louisiana dealt with challenge and adversity as they develop their fiber to the home network LUS Fiber. In addition to warding off both legal and strategic attacks from the big incumbent ISPs, community leaders have had to be mindful of strict state rules that impose added restrictions on their operations. This week, Christopher talks with one of the people instrumental in bringing high quality Internet access to the people of Lafayette. Terry Huval. Terry is retiring soon, and we wanted to hear some of his reflections on what went well, what were some of the community's toughest challenges, and how they've met and exceeded the goals they set. using the fiber network as a critical development tool. There is much to the story of Lafayette, including our 2012 report Broadband at the Speed of Light. For more, check out muninetworks.org. Now, here's Christopher with Terry Huval from Lafayette Utility System.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self Reliance, back in my office in Minneapolis. But today I'm speaking with Terry Huval, the director of Lafayette Utility System in Lafayette, Louisiana. Welcome back to the show.

Terry Huval: Bonjour!

Christopher Mitchell: How are things down there, deep in Cajun country?

Terry Huval: Oh, it's nice and steamy and hot and beautiful.

Christopher Mitchell: Just the way you like it, I am sure.

Terry Huval: Absolutely...

Read more
Posted June 26, 2018 by Staff

This is the transcript for episode 132 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. Christopher interviews Tony Neal-Graves from Colorado's Broadband Office at Mountain Connect. Listen to this episode here.

Tony Neal-Graves: And one of the things I would say about my role is that everywhere I go around the state, the first question I always ask is, how can the state help you in solving the problem that you have?

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 312 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. Here's another interview Christopher recorded while at the Mountain Connect conference event in Vail, Colorado. This time he spoke with Tony Neal-Graves, who works for the state of Colorado, heading up their Broadband Office. Christopher and Tony covered issues such as changes in Colorado's legislation, FCC versus state data collection, electric cooperatives, and the way local and regional governments work together toward rural broadband deployment. They get into other topics as well that reflect why Colorado is one of the states that seems to be ahead of the pack when it comes to improving rural Internet access. Now, here's Christopher with Tony Neal-Graves from the Colorado Broadband Office.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell, still in Vail, Colorado, at the Mountain Connect conference. Today I'm talking to someone I hoped to talk to last year, but you got away from me, Tony Neal-Graves, the executive director of the Broadband Office here in Colorado. Welcome to the show.

Tony Neal-Graves: Thank you, Chris. Good to be here.

Christopher Mitchell: So, last year you came in and you talked about how you're a little bit new to the office. But I think the best thing to do to start off and just say what does the Broadband Office do here in Colorado?

Tony Neal-Graves: Sure. The governor created this office a year ago when I came into the role in March of last year to really kind of bring together all of the efforts at the state level in terms of trying to make sure that broadband deployment happens across the state of Colorado. There's been efforts going on in this space...

Read more
Posted June 19, 2018 by Staff

This is the transcript for episode 311 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. Christopher Mitchell gets an update on how folks in Larimer County, Colorado, are improving their communities' high-speed Internet access. Listen to this episode here.

Jacob Castillo: We'd love to see jobs created, wealth generated, that are low impact, environmentally-friendly types of jobs, and one of the enabling factors for that is high speed Internet.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 311 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast, from the Institute for Local Self Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. While Christopher was at the Mountain Connect conference event in Vail, Colorado, he caught up with other attendees and presenters. Some of the people he checked in with were from communities that are engaged in exploring better local connectivity. Drew Davis, Jacob Castillo, and Mark Pfaffinger from Larimer County, Colorado, were at the conference and took time to update Christopher on their efforts. They've recently received results from a survey and share some of the surprises that they discovered from people in Larimer County. In addition to improving connectivity in Larimer county for students and families, Drew, Jacob, and Mark were encouraged by the economic development possibilities broadband can bring. The guys also discussed the different strategies the county may take, and the role they expect Larimer County to play as the community moves forward. Now, here's Christopher with Drew Davis. Jacob Castillo and Mark Pfaffinger from Larimer County, Colorado.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. This is Chris Mitchell coming to you from Vail, Colorado, once again, home of the Mountain Connect conference for 2018, sitting across from three folks from Larimer County: Drew Davis, the broadband program manager for the county. Welcome to the show.

Drew Davis: Thanks Chris. It's a pleasure to be here.

Christopher Mitchell: We've got Jacob Castillo, the director of economic and workforce development. Welcome to the show.

Jacob Castillo: Thank you. Pleasure to be here.

Christopher Mitchell: And Mark...

Read more
Posted June 19, 2018 by Staff

This is the transcript for episode 310 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. In this episode, Rick Smith joins the show to dicuss Colorado's connectivity. Listen to this episode here.

 

Rick Smith: I've always held to the belief that just because we choose to live in rural Colorado does not mean we shouldn't have services on par with the urban areas of Colorado. If we don't solve this problem, there's not going to be a white knight come marching into town and and save the day.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 310 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. Christopher is on the road again. This time he's in Colorado at the Mountain Connect event in Vail. While he's there, he's having all sorts of conversations that we want to share. The first of his guests is Rick Smith from Cortez, Colorado. Rick was last on the show way back in 2014 for episode number 98. Rick and the community have learned a lot since then about open access, working with ISPs, and what direction they want to go next. In addition to sharing lessons learned, Rick and Chris discussed potential plans for the future, which include the Cortez pilot project and the city's foray into retail services. They also discuss what Cortez is discovering as they examine a possible citywide build out, funding options, and ways to overcome their digital divide. Now, here's Christopher with Rick Smith from Cortez, Colorado.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell, recording live in Vail, Colorado at the wonderful and the ever so valuable Mountain Connect conference, sitting here across from Rick Smith, the director of general services for the city of Cortez, and a repeat guest on the show. Welcome back, Rick.

Rick Smith: Thank you very much, Chris.

Christopher Mitchell: Cortez is in the southwest corner of Colorado. It's a rural area in Montezuma County. What else should people know about it if they're not familiar?

Rick Smith: Well, we're right next door to Mesa Verde National Park. And, currently we have two fires going on. So, the state's really in a drought...

Read more
Posted June 8, 2018 by Staff

This is the transcript for Episode 309 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. The towns of Baileyville and Calais, Maine, joined forces to create a the Downeast Broadband Utility. Christopher interviews Julie Jordan, the director of the project.

 

Julie Jordan: You couldn't really go out and attract young people or new employers without this good piece of infrastructure.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 309 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. As one of our most rural states,q Maine has many regions lacking in high quality connectivity. Over the past few years, we've seen several communities engage in projects to develop publicly owned networks. They want to bring broadband to places where big ISP won't upgrade their services. In this week's podcast, Christopher talks with Julie Jordan, who lives and works in one of those rural Maine communities. The towns of Baileyville and Calais have joined together to form the Downeast Broadband Utility. They plan to deploy a fiber optic network in the region for residents and businesses. Their project caught the eye of the Post Road Foundation, a nonprofit organization that is researching the possibilities of linking smart grid applications and multiple utility functions. In this interview, Christopher talks with Julie about the Downeast Broadband Utility project, some of the challenges they've had to overcome, and how the Post Road Foundation will be involved in studying their project. Now here's Christopher with Julie Jordan from the Downeast Broadband Utility in Maine.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self Reliance up in Minneapolis, Minnesota. And today I'm speaking with Julie Jordan, the director of the Downeast Broadband Utility. Welcome to the show.

Julie Jordan: Thanks, Chris.

Christopher Mitchell: I'm really excited to be talking to you, because I was just out in Maine where the downeast region is and I find Maine to be inspiring in terms of the work that's being done from local communities and I'm just really excited to tell more people about what's happening. But the first thing is when we say "down...

Read more
Posted May 29, 2018 by Staff

This is the transcript for episode 308 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. Mayor Marian Orr of Cheyenne, Wyoming, joins the show to discuss broadband access in the state. Listen to this episode here.

Marian Orr: The incumbents will claim that we are actually a terabyte city and I have yet to see that.

Lisa Gonzalez: This is episode 308 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. Cheyenne, Wyoming, home to more than 60,000 people, seems like a place densely populated enough to encourage the incumbents to offer fast, affordable, reliable connectivity. While big ISPs claimed that the city is sufficiently served, businesses and residents don't agree. Speeds are not where they need to be and rates are high. In order to solve the situation, community leaders, including Mayor Marian Orr, have been looking into possible solutions. Mayor Orr took some time out of her schedule to talk to Christopher for this week's podcast. In addition to some of the steps the community is taking, Mayor Orr and Christopher discussed Senate File 100, a piece of legislation passed during Wyoming's most recent session to improve broadband access. The bill started out as a way to provide resources to local communities, but as Mayor Orr describes, incumbents intervened and the outcome changed significantly. Christopher and the mayor talk about the steps Cheyenne has taken so far and where they're headed next. Onto the interview.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another edition of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self Reliance up in Minneapolis. Today I'm speaking with Mayor Marian Orr, the mayor of Cheyenne, Wyoming. Welcome to the show.

Marian Orr: Good morning.

Christopher M: Well, I'm very excited to speak with you. I've been through Wyoming a couple of times. It is a crazy beautiful state. I get a sense you've been around all parts of it, and I'm curious if you can tell us a little bit about your corner of Cheyenne currently.

Marian Orr: Our state is beautiful. We, here in Cheyenne, we are in the southeast corner with our population is about 63,000. We are just only about a hundred...

Read more

Pages

Subscribe to transcript